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A135 HEPA_No sleeves CROPPED

The Whitley A135 HEPA Anaerobic Workstation

Don Whitley Scientific is proud to present the new Whitley A135 HEPA Anaerobic Workstation: the tallest, deepest, widest anaerobic workstation in our extensive range. It is specifically designed to maintain strict anaerobic conditions within a controlled environment.
 
The Whitley A135 HEPA has an enormous capacity of almost 600 litres, perfect for working and incubation. It will accommodate a variety of items of equipment such as microscopes, plate readers and colony pickers. (Be sure to discuss your requirements with us at the earliest opportunity).

With a volume twice that of a Whitley A35 Anaerobic Workstation, the A135 also comes fitted with a large removable front – ideal for the transfer of equipment in and out of the workstation. Other great DWS features include:

•           Anaerobic conditions monitoring system
•           Internal HEPA filtration system with enhanced biological containment
•           Rapid 12 litre airlock for sample transfer
•           7” full colour touch screen, Ethernet-enabled for remote access.

135 features

Internal dimensions (w x d x h): 1100mm x 750mm x 710mm
External dimensions (w x d x h): 1452mm x 1056mm x 993mm

Without compromising quality or precision, this innovative product allows you to take your research to new heights whilst maintaining confidence in your results.

 

For more information – email us at sales@dwscientific.co.uk or call us on +44 (0) 1274 595728

Clostridium difficile studies can be done in a Whitley Workstation

Hallmarks of Cancer: Sustaining Growth and Resisting Cell Death

In part four of our mini-series describing “Hypoxia and the Hallmarks of Cancer”, we look more closely at how researchers are using the Hypoxystation to delineate the Hallmarks Sustaining Growth and Resisting Cell Death.

 

 

 

 

 

Hallmarks of Cancer

Resisting Cell Death

The ability of cells to resist cell death under hypoxic conditions is central to the progression of cancer and the acquisition of resistance to chemotherapy so frequently encountered in tumors. Hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment exerts selective pressure favoring cells that have lost the functionality of apoptosis genes and can expand uncontrollably.  Hypoxia also contributes to survival by inducing autophagy, in a pathway involving HIF-1, beclin, BNIP3 and BNIP3L, in which cellular autophagy acts to recycle cellular organelles, satisfy metabolic demand and improve hypoxic tolerance.  HIF-1 mediates cell-cycle retardation and arrest, causing hypoxic tumor cells to become resistant to radiotherapies. NF-κB, through its effects on myriad transcription factors, for example through inhibition of cell death signalling, is activated by hypoxia and reactive oxygen species, and also promotes cell survival.

Sustaining Growth

Cancer is essentially based on the cells’ inability to “stop” when suppressors signal an end to growth, and the compunction to “go” despite a lack of bonafide growth signals. Hypoxia in the context of cancer, in precipitating genomic instability and mutation, results in numerous inactive tumor suppressor genes and activated growth factor genes, such that the combination of constitutive proliferative signaling and mutated cancer genes leads to sustained growth. HIF and NF-κB regulated pathways involving Notch, mTOR, WNT11, CAIX, and IGF-1, among many others, contribute to sustained growth in cancer as regulation of proliferation derails. Induced by hypoxia-regulated proteins, anabolic pathways for nucleotide and lipid synthesis are ramped up and enable the rapid proliferation typical of cancer.

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Hypoxia and the Hallmarks of Cancer: Angiogenesis and Metastasis

The following was provided by HypOxygen, our distributor of Hypoxic Workstations in the US – Hanahan and Weinberg’s “Hallmarks of Cancer” are at the root of the multi-step progression of cancer, and they are all influenced by hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment. In this mini-review series, HypOxygen has been taking a closer look at the way Hypoxystation users worldwide are delineating the effects of hypoxia on the Hallmarks of Cancer: so far, we’ve showcased Avoiding Immune Destruction and Tumour Promoting Inflammation and Genome Instability and Mutation and Enabling Replicative Immortality.

In the Hypoxystation, researchers working with cells in culture can mimic the physiological conditions that produce those characteristic Hallmarks. The Hypoxystation enables glove-less access to cultivate and manipulate cells under physiological conditions, in a HEPA-clean environment. Oxygen levels in the Hypoxystation can be reliably and accurately adjusted to below 1%, reflecting the high metabolism, low perfusion tumor microenvironment.

 

hypoxia

 

Hallmarks Of Cancer
1. Inducing Angiogenesis

Angiogenesis and tumor-associated neo-vascularization are central to the progression of cancer, and hypoxia in the fast-growing, poorly perfused tumor setting is one of the main factors driving the formation of new vessels. Hypoxia in the tumor activates the hypoxia stress response, which is mediated at the cellular level by HIF, VEGF and many other cytokines, growth factors and guidance molecules. As a consequence, endothelial cells and pericytes proliferate and form new blood vessels, which are, however, disorderly and leaky, in turn exacerbating hypoxia in the tumor. Cancer treatment strategies striving to normalize tumor vessels for the purpose of improved drug delivery and alleviation of hypoxia in the tumor are showing great promise.

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2. Activating Invasion and Metastasis

As with the other Hallmarks of Cancer, metastasis and cancer progression are correlated with low oxygen levels in the tumor. HIF’s activate the expression of more than 1000 genes, numerous of which play a role in inducing genes involved in the EMT, through direct interactions with HRE’s at promotor sites and other mechanisms such as epigenetic alterations, like methylation/demethylation. Hypoxia promotes migration and invasion by facilitating the endothelial-mesenchymal transition, altering cell-cell contacts, and reducing adhesion to the extra-cellular matrix. Cancer cells and neighboring cells such as fibroblasts are all influenced by hypoxia, and all contribute to the restructuring of the tumor microenvironment. The effects of the Hallmarks of Cancer continually perturb and promote each other, as when hypoxia-driven metabolic reprogramming causes acidification of the extracellular microenvironment through increased production and secretion of lactate, in turn augmenting ECM remodeling and immune evasion. Similarly, formation of novel blood vessels enables extravasation and migration of cancer cells to form new tumors.

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KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Use of an Oxygen Controlled Workstation with High-Efficiency HEPA-Filtration System in Drug Toxicity Studies Incompatible with Antibiotic Media Supplementation

ABSTRACT
In drugs toxicity testing, the quality of the atmosphere in which cell handling is carried out is of heightened importance due to the inability to supplement culture media with antibiotics. Further to this, many researchers wish to use low oxygen environments to ensure their model in-vitro systems are as physiologically relevant to the in-vivo system as possible.

This document describes the use of a Whitley H35 HEPA Hypoxystation to provide a HEPA filtered, environmentally defined, work and incubation space for drug toxicity testing in a cardiac spheroid model, whilst also allowing pre-programmed oxygen profiles to simulate the in-vivo system in health and disease.

To read more on this, click here.