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Posts Tagged ‘Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation’

Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation in use

Whitley Workstations Used in Novel Research Approach to Neurodegenerative Disorders

Efficient energy production is primarily driven by oxygen and is crucial in the brain, which consumes 20% of the body’s total energy whilst weighing only 2% of the total body weight. Loss of oxygen in the brain (hypoxia) can result in brain damage, which can contribute to dementia including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and can influence amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, commonly known as motor neuron disease) disease mechanisms. Those mechanisms are often poorly understood, however, the cellular consequence of hypoxia including disruptions to energy supply are often observed in the brains of patients with these neurodegenerative disorders. The ability to model a hypoxic environment and study the effects on AD and ALS in the laboratory has historically been limited by the lack of available technology.

The SITraN laboratory takes the gold standard approach for measuring the effect of hypoxia on energy generating pathways in cells by using an XF metabolic bioanalyser (which measures energy generation in a non-invasive manner in cells, Seahorse Bioscience/Agilent), housed within an i2 Instrument Workstation and H35 HEPA Hypoxystation. The i2 chamber has been designed specifically to house and run metabolic flux assays using the XF bioanalyser in a hypoxic environment. The H35 section of the chamber is HEPA filtered and gas, temperature and humidity controlled allowing us to perform cell manipulation on our ALS and AD cell models.

Using this novel combination of technologies – SITraN aims to measure how hypoxia affects the energy generating pathways in brain cells. Their novel approach will allow the identification of the pathways involved in the cell response to hypoxia, which lead to energy disruption in patients with AD and ALS and will allow therapeutic hypoxic markers of disease to be identified for future clinical studies.

Article provided by Dr Scott Allen, Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience (SITraN), University of Sheffield. 

Dr Allen will be presenting at the ALS/MND Symposium in Glasgow held from 7-9 December 2018.

Range of Large Hypoxic Workstations to Accommodate Laboratory Instruments

Abrupt changes in temperature and oxygen levels can significantly alter the many oxygen-sensitive signalling pathways that sense and react to the cellular micro-environment. Don Whitley Scientific have developed a range of hypoxic workstations large enough to accommodate many instruments which would previously have been confined to the bench; minimising the need to transfer cells between bench and workstation which would result in exposing them to raised levels of oxygen.

The H135 HEPA Hypoxystation and i2 Instrument Workstation have larger footprints and optional shelving to provide ample space for both instrumentation and culturing. The removable front facilitates transfer of equipment in and out of the workstations. Precise control of temperature, oxygen, carbon dioxide and humidity mimic the physiological environment, ensuring true in vivo cell behaviour.

Working with manufacturers of diverse laboratory instruments, Don Whitley Scientific have validated a number of options for analysis and imaging of cells:

Whitley H135 HEPA Hypoxystation

* Incucyte® live-cell analysis: the Incucyte ZOOM comfortably fits inside the H135, enabling real-time quantitative study of growing cells inside the hypoxic incubator environment

* Microscopes: a range of microscopes can be placed inside the controlled workstation environment, allowing users to image cells during incubation

* Seahorse XFe Analyzer: a modified version of the H135, the i2 Instrument Workstation, has been customised to accommodate the specific requirements of the XF Analyzer for metabolism assays.

We are happy to discuss your unique sizing and environmental needs; please contact us today to discuss any custom requirements.

What our users are saying:

“Due to the utility of having the Incucyte S3 live imaging system inside our H135 Workstation, we have expanded our collaboration portfolio exponentially. We have performed cancer biology, immunology, neuro and vascular physiology, and many other types of experiments in our system under controlled atmospheric conditions. The large volume of the H135 is key to having enough room for both the imager and sufficient workspace to carry out experiments.”

– Dr Adam Case, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Cellular and Integrative Physiology,
University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE.

 

Interrogating gynaecological cancer cell metabolism at different oxygen tensions reveals simvastatin as metabolic regulator.

Earlier this month at the Keystone Symposia, Hypoxia: From Basic Mechanisms to Therapeutics, Dr Ayse Latif (pictured below) from the University of Manchester presented a poster entitled “Interrogating gynaecological cancer cell metabolism at different oxygen tensions reveals simvastatin as metabolic regulator”.

The poster describes the background of the study
as follows:Ayse Latif Keystone

Around 200,000 new cases of gynaecological cancers are diagnosed in Europe every year. Potentially 75% of these cancers could benefit from improved treatment regimes. Gynaecological cancer cells have an increased glycolysis rate and lactate concentration which have been suggested to predict increased likelihood of metastasis, resistance to therapy and reduced survival in patients. Lactate transport in cancer cells is carried out by members of the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) family, notably MCT1/4. Thus, we hypothesized that pharmacologic inhibition of MCTs could improve treatment outcome by reducing glycolytic potential of these tumour cells… (To continue reading, click here).

Researchers at the University of Manchester used a Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation, housing a Seahorse XF Analyzer, connected to a Whitley H35 HEPA Hypoxystation. This allowed for the preparation of cell lines under hypoxic conditions and their subsequent transfer to the i2 for analysis in a CO2 free and controlled temperature environment without exposure to ambient conditions.

 

 

 

H135 image

H135 at Keystone Symposia: Dublin

Representatives from Don Whitley Scientific and our American distributor, HypOxygen, are attending the Keystone Symposia on Hypoxia: From Basic Mechanisms to Therapeutics this week in Dublin, Ireland. From May 12th – 17th you will have the opportunity to see the brand new Whitley H135 HEPA Hypoxic Workstation.

Delegates attending the Keystone Meeting can pick up a free Hypoxia t-shirt from the DWS stand - while stocks last!

Delegates attending the Keystone Meeting can pick up a free Hypoxia t-shirt from the DWS stand – while stocks last!

The largest workstation in our range, the H135 (pictured left) has an enormous capacity for working and incubation of over 550 litres. Combined with the ability to house large pieces of equipment such as live cell imaging devices, microscopes, plate readers and more – it’s our most revolutionary Hypoxystation yet.

Without compromising on quality or precision, this innovative product allows you to take your research to new heights whilst maintaining confidence in your results.

 Some of the great features include:

  • Rapid 12L airlock
  • 3 gas operation
  • Automated Ocalibration
  • Removable front
  • Option for Whitley Internal HEPA Filtration System with Enhanced Biological Containment

Read more

HypOxygen at AACR Meeting

Our American distributors, HypOxygen, are exhibiting Whitley Workstations at this year’s AACR meeting in Philadelphia. Go over to their stand to see the i2 Instrument Workstation (specifically designed to house a Seahorse XF Analyzer in physiologically relevant conditions), H35 Hypoxystation and also to learn about our range of HEPA workstations.

EK, BKF at AACR2Pictured here is Evan Kitsell, Design Director at Don Whitley Scientific Ltd, and Dr Burga Kalz Fuller, Product Manager at HypOxygen. They will be available to demonstrate the workstations and answer any questions you may have.

As the AACR‘s website describes: this year’s meeting will “highlight the latest, most exciting discoveries in every area of cancer research and will provide a unique opportunity for investigators from all over the world to meet, interact, and share their insights. This year’s meeting theme – Bringing Cancer Discoveries to Patients – underscores the vital and inextricable link between discovery and treatment, and it reinforces the fact that research underpins all the progress we are making in the field toward cancer cures.”

 

 

 

i2 and H35 HEPA at ICR London

Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation used in deciphering the metabolic properties of Breast Cancer

The Institute of Cancer Research, London, is Europe’s largest cancer centre and one of the world’s most influential research institutes, with an outstanding record of achievement dating back more than 100 years.

Staff at the ICR with their new Whitley Workstations

ICR staff with their i2 and H35 HEPA Workstations

Cancer cells display unique alterations in their signalling and metabolic circuitry in order to fuel their growth and proliferation and/or adapt to conditions of oxygen and nutrient deprivation. The Signalling and Cancer Metabolism Team, led by Dr George Poulogiannis uses high-throughput technologies including mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, and utilizes the Seahorse XF Analyzer to measure the basal oxygen consumption and glycolysis rates in order to reveal the metabolic dependencies of breast cancer-driven alterations. We are using a Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation to study the signalling and metabolic pathways that may preserve breast cancer cell viability under hypoxia. In addition to this, we have a general interest in identifying what signalling and metabolic pathways are associated with the acquisition of microsatellite (MSI) and chromosomal instability (CIN) under oxygen deprivation conditions. Finally, we are studying the role of hypoxia in cell invasion and metastasis, oncogene-induced senescence and resistance to current treatment options.

George Poulogiannis
Team Leader
Division of Cancer Biology
Institute of Cancer Research, London

i2 Workstation Testimonial Video

In this video – the latest in our series of customer testimonials – Dr Ayse Latif, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, discusses her current research of exploiting tumour cell energy metabolism in order to improve gynaecological cancer treatments.

Dr Latif uses both a H35 HEPA Hypoxystation and an i2 Instrument Workstation. Whilst cells are initially incubated in the H35, they are then moved into the i2 via the Whitley Transfer Tunnel without exposure to ambient conditions, where they can be studied with a Seahorse XF Analyzer.

The i2 was designed to meet the exact requirements  of Seahorse Bioscience, meaning that the combination of this workstation and a Seahorse XF Analyzer permits simultaneous, real-time analysis of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in mammalian cells under precisely controlled conditions.

Filming (2)

New Hypoxystation Videos

Hot on the heels of the Oscars, we go behind the scenes in science!

Earlier this week, we filmed the latest in our series of short videos about the research that is being conducted in our Hypoxic workstations. We went to visit Dr Ayse Latif from the Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, and Dr Michael Cross from the Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Liverpool.

Both Dr Latif and Dr Cross use Whitley H35 HEPA Hypoxystations in their work, and Dr Latif also uses a Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation housing a Seahorse XFe96 Analyzer. These videos will be uploaded to our website shortly.

Dr Cross spoke about his study of endothelial cells, the long-term incubation of multicellular cardiac spheroids and ischaemia in the human heart. Dr Latif discussed her work in exploiting tumour cell metabolism in order to improve treatment for gynaecological cancer patients.

Click here to have a look at our earlier video with Dr Violaine See.

 

 

University of Würzburg

i2 Installed at University of Würzburg

 

Engineers from Don Whitley Scientific and our German subsidiary Meintrup-DWS recently installed a Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation at the University of Würzburg, Germany. The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology have an existing Whitley H35 Hypoxystation, and the i2 has been connected to this via the Whitley Transfer Tunnel.

The combination of a Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation and Seahorse XF Analyzer (pictured below inside the workstation) permits simultaneous, real-time analysis of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in mammalian cells under precisely controlled hypoxic conditions.

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Studying Mitochondria in Hypoxia

Having recently attended the joint symposium on “Mitochondria, Metabolism and Heart Failure” and “Diabetes and Metabolic Dysfunction” in Santa Fe, New Mexico, our product manager, Dr Burga Kalz Fuller of HypOxygen, was fascinated by the enthusiasm of the attendees and the wide range of topics. Some of these included:

  • Metabolic communication between different organs and tissues based on energy expenditure
  • Anti-diabetic and anti-obesity effects of thermogenic pathways in brown and beige fat
  • PINK1 and Parkin in mitophagy and MAPL/Drp1 in mitochondrial fission
  • The role of mitochondrial DNA in ageing and degenerative diseases
  • The influence of gut microbiota on human metabolism and gene expression through accessing intestinal chromatin
  • Localisation of fatty acids in lipid droplets or mitochondria in well-fed and starved cells
  • Postnatal mitochondrial remodelling in cardiomyocytes
  • Association of branched-chain amino acids with insulin resistance, obesity and coronary heart disease
  • Protection of cardiac mitochondria from elevated ROS in ischemia/reperfusion states.

    Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation

    Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation

What brought all these researchers to Santa Fe were the different facets of metabolism and energy homeostasis, with mitochondria proving the most common theme. Mitochondria are the primary oxygen sensors in the cell, operating through mechanisms of reactive oxygen species, HIF pathways, TOR signalling and other means. Physiological normoxia in healthy tissue is significantly lower than the 21% oxygen present in air, and oxygen tension in many disease states is even lower. As a result of this, in vitro cell culture performed under ambient conditions in a CO2 incubator is entirely unrepresentative of in vivo conditions in tissue.

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