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Posts Tagged ‘i2 Workstation’

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HypOxygen at the AACR Annual Meeting

Our American distributor, HypOxygen, are exhibiting at the American Association of Cancer Research annual meeting. Exhibiting the Whitley H35 Hypoxystation and the Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation, HypOxygen will be promoting the importance of using this equipment when working at different stages of cell culture within the context of cancer research. The words below, from HypOxygen, describe this in more detail.

The hallmarks of cancer, from reprogramming energy metabolism through sustained angiogenesis to evasion of the immune response, are linked to the low oxygen tension typical of the tumour microenvironment. Hypoxia is a crucial determinant of cellular signalling, inflammation, cancer progression, and therapy resistance, through pathways mediated by HIF’s and other oxygen-sensing factors. That’s why cancer research consistently benefits from the use of a closed workstation for cell culture that supports in vivo physiology and behaviour. Based on these insights, the Hypoxystation creates conditions that mimic the cellular microenvironment with regard to oxygen tension, temperature, and humidity, while class 3 clean air through HEPA filtration and sterile humidity guarantee worry-free long-term cell culture.

The capacity to stably incubate cell cultures at hypoxic conditions down to 0.1% oxygen depends on precise monitoring of conditions, accurate regulation of gasses, and on the ability to retain the atmosphere for a long time once it is achieved. Based on studies performed at Don Whitley Scientific recently, the “at rest” gas consumption in our H35 Hypoxystation is much lower than in other workstations: Nitrogen 3.5 l/24 hrs, CO2 1 l/24 hours. In contrast, published nitrogen usage in competitors’ hypoxia workstations is 28 and 47 times higher, and CO2 consumption is 5-7 times higher.

You can find the details of that study on the HypOxygen website here.

 

HypOxygen at the AACR

 

HypOxygen will be showing the H35 and i2 Instrument Hypoxystations for physiological cell culture at the AACR Annual Meeting in New Orleans from 17/04/16 – 20/04/15 at booth 448.

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HypOxygen at Society for Redox Biology and Medicine

The Society for Redox Biology and Medicine’s Annual Meeting (SFRBM 2015) has long been the premier venue for cutting edge research in all aspects of redox biology, featuring the latest technologies and applications in basic and translational research.

HypOxygen, our US distributor, will be at the meeting exhibiting a Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation as well as the BlueBlink optical oxygen sensor. Please visit the HypOxygen exhibit at the 22nd Annual Meeting of the SFRBM in Boston, USA, from 18 – 23 November. They will be happy to discuss low oxygen applications that interest you.

For more information on SFRBM – click here

HypOxygen at AACR Meeting

Our American distributors, HypOxygen, are exhibiting Whitley Workstations at this year’s AACR meeting in Philadelphia. Go over to their stand to see the i2 Instrument Workstation (specifically designed to house a Seahorse XF Analyzer in physiologically relevant conditions), H35 Hypoxystation and also to learn about our range of HEPA workstations.

EK, BKF at AACR2Pictured here is Evan Kitsell, Design Director at Don Whitley Scientific Ltd, and Dr Burga Kalz Fuller, Product Manager at HypOxygen. They will be available to demonstrate the workstations and answer any questions you may have.

As the AACR‘s website describes: this year’s meeting will “highlight the latest, most exciting discoveries in every area of cancer research and will provide a unique opportunity for investigators from all over the world to meet, interact, and share their insights. This year’s meeting theme – Bringing Cancer Discoveries to Patients – underscores the vital and inextricable link between discovery and treatment, and it reinforces the fact that research underpins all the progress we are making in the field toward cancer cures.”

 

 

 

i2 and H35 HEPA at ICR London

Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation used in deciphering the metabolic properties of Breast Cancer

The Institute of Cancer Research, London, is Europe’s largest cancer centre and one of the world’s most influential research institutes, with an outstanding record of achievement dating back more than 100 years.

Staff at the ICR with their new Whitley Workstations

ICR staff with their i2 and H35 HEPA Workstations

Cancer cells display unique alterations in their signalling and metabolic circuitry in order to fuel their growth and proliferation and/or adapt to conditions of oxygen and nutrient deprivation. The Signalling and Cancer Metabolism Team, led by Dr George Poulogiannis uses high-throughput technologies including mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, and utilizes the Seahorse XF Analyzer to measure the basal oxygen consumption and glycolysis rates in order to reveal the metabolic dependencies of breast cancer-driven alterations. We are using a Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation to study the signalling and metabolic pathways that may preserve breast cancer cell viability under hypoxia. In addition to this, we have a general interest in identifying what signalling and metabolic pathways are associated with the acquisition of microsatellite (MSI) and chromosomal instability (CIN) under oxygen deprivation conditions. Finally, we are studying the role of hypoxia in cell invasion and metastasis, oncogene-induced senescence and resistance to current treatment options.

George Poulogiannis
Team Leader
Division of Cancer Biology
Institute of Cancer Research, London

i2 Workstation Testimonial Video

In this video – the latest in our series of customer testimonials – Dr Ayse Latif, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, discusses her current research of exploiting tumour cell energy metabolism in order to improve gynaecological cancer treatments.

Dr Latif uses both a H35 HEPA Hypoxystation and an i2 Instrument Workstation. Whilst cells are initially incubated in the H35, they are then moved into the i2 via the Whitley Transfer Tunnel without exposure to ambient conditions, where they can be studied with a Seahorse XF Analyzer.

The i2 was designed to meet the exact requirements  of Seahorse Bioscience, meaning that the combination of this workstation and a Seahorse XF Analyzer permits simultaneous, real-time analysis of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in mammalian cells under precisely controlled conditions.

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New Hypoxystation Videos

Hot on the heels of the Oscars, we go behind the scenes in science!

Earlier this week, we filmed the latest in our series of short videos about the research that is being conducted in our Hypoxic workstations. We went to visit Dr Ayse Latif from the Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, and Dr Michael Cross from the Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Liverpool.

Both Dr Latif and Dr Cross use Whitley H35 HEPA Hypoxystations in their work, and Dr Latif also uses a Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation housing a Seahorse XFe96 Analyzer. These videos will be uploaded to our website shortly.

Dr Cross spoke about his study of endothelial cells, the long-term incubation of multicellular cardiac spheroids and ischaemia in the human heart. Dr Latif discussed her work in exploiting tumour cell metabolism in order to improve treatment for gynaecological cancer patients.

Click here to have a look at our earlier video with Dr Violaine See.

 

 

Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation

NEW Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation

The Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation has been developed in response to a rising number of enquiries from scientists who desire to use Seahorse Extracellular Flux (XF) Analyzers* in hypoxic conditions and were dissatisfied with the solutions available. Rather than adapting an existing chamber for this purpose, Don Whitley Scientific developed a new workstation specifically to suit the precise requirements of Seahorse Bioscience.

Extensive research and careful consideration has gone into the development of the i2, which has resulted in a modular system that includes a number of novel and unique features. This workstation can be used as a stand-alone unit or connected to a Whitley Hypoxystation via the new Whitley Transfer Tunnel, enabling preparation of cell lines under hypoxic conditions and their transfer directly into the i2 without exposure to air.

Another unique feature is the integral incubator, which enables you to precondition cellware and incubate plates and media at 37°C under the same atmospheric conditions as the XF Analyzer.

The i2 maintains an internal temperature no higher than 28°C, excludes carbon dioxide, and provides precise oxygen control.

This workstation, the latest in a long line of well-regarded modified atmosphere workstations from Don Whitley Scientific, is equipped with a generous working area in which to conduct preparatory work and is supplied complete with removable front, bespoke trolley, internal mains sockets, and a wireless footswitch to control the patented oval ports.

Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation connected to a H35 HEPA Hypoxystation

Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation connected to a H35 HEPA Hypoxystation

The 12 litre airlock, with a cycle time of just 60 seconds, accommodates up to 44 × 96 well plates or 84 × T25 tissue culture flasks plus numerous other flasks, pipettes and laboratory consumables.

The Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation is the first in a new range of larger Whitley Workstations developed to allow customers to use a variety of items of specialised equipment under modified atmospheric conditions.

The combination of a Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation and Seahorse XF Analyzer permits simultaneous, real-time analysis of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in mammalian cells under precisely controlled hypoxic conditions.

If your research requires unsurpassed accuracy, reproducibility and reliability, then insist on a Whitley Workstation.

 

 

* Not presently suitable for the recently announced Seahorse Bioscience XF-p