DON WHITLEY SCIENTIFIC – THE LEADING INTERNATIONAL SUPPLIER TO THE MICROBIOLOGY AND TISSUE CULTURE INDUSTRIES


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Posts Tagged ‘hypoxic chamber’

Range of Large Hypoxic Workstations to Accommodate Laboratory Instruments

Abrupt changes in temperature and oxygen levels can significantly alter the many oxygen-sensitive signalling pathways that sense and react to the cellular micro-environment. Don Whitley Scientific have developed a range of hypoxic workstations large enough to accommodate many instruments which would previously have been confined to the bench; minimising the need to transfer cells between bench and workstation which would result in exposing them to raised levels of oxygen.

The H135 HEPA Hypoxystation and i2 Instrument Workstation have larger footprints and optional shelving to provide ample space for both instrumentation and culturing. The removable front facilitates transfer of equipment in and out of the workstations. Precise control of temperature, oxygen, carbon dioxide and humidity mimic the physiological environment, ensuring true in vivo cell behaviour.

Working with manufacturers of diverse laboratory instruments, Don Whitley Scientific have validated a number of options for analysis and imaging of cells:

Whitley H135 HEPA Hypoxystation

* Incucyte® live-cell analysis: the Incucyte ZOOM comfortably fits inside the H135, enabling real-time quantitative study of growing cells inside the hypoxic incubator environment

* Microscopes: a range of microscopes can be placed inside the controlled workstation environment, allowing users to image cells during incubation

* Seahorse XFe Analyzer: a modified version of the H135, the i2 Instrument Workstation, has been customised to accommodate the specific requirements of the XF Analyzer for metabolism assays.

We are happy to discuss your unique sizing and environmental needs; please contact us today to discuss any custom requirements.

What our users are saying:

“Due to the utility of having the Incucyte S3 live imaging system inside our H135 Workstation, we have expanded our collaboration portfolio exponentially. We have performed cancer biology, immunology, neuro and vascular physiology, and many other types of experiments in our system under controlled atmospheric conditions. The large volume of the H135 is key to having enough room for both the imager and sufficient workspace to carry out experiments.”

– Dr Adam Case, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Cellular and Integrative Physiology,
University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE.

 

Whitley Hypoxystation

The Leukemic Stem Cell Niche: Adaptation to “Hypoxia” Versus Oncogene Addiction

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are responsible for constantly maintaining and replenishing the supply of new blood and immune cells. They give rise to both lymphoid and myeloid progenitor cells, which then proceed to differentiate down their respective paths to form various specialized cells such as erythrocytes, macrophages, B and T cells, to name a few. Within the body, HSCs are found to reside in extremely low oxygen environments called stem cell niches (SCN). Like all other regulated cell cycles, HSCs can lead to cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma if cell division becomes uncontrolled.

MEL (a), Kasumi-1 (b), or NB4 (c) cells were incubated in atmosphere at 0.1% O2 and lysed at the indicated times, and total cell lysates were subjected to immunoblotting with the indicated antibodies. GAPDH, H4, or ARD1 were detected to verify loading equalization. Migration of molecular weight markers is indicated on the left (kDa). For each cell population, one out of three independent experiments with similar outcome is shown.

Figure 2: Suppression of oncogenic proteins driving non-CML blood neoplasias in the course of cell “adaptation to hypoxia.” MEL (a), Kasumi-1 (b), or NB4 (c) cells were incubated in atmosphere at 0.1% O2 and lysed at the indicated times, and total cell lysates were subjected to immunoblotting with the indicated antibodies. GAPDH, H4, or ARD1 were detected to verify loading equalization. Migration of molecular weight markers is indicated on the left (kDa). For each cell population, one out of three independent experiments with similar outcome is shown.

In this paper, Cheloni et al. primarily focused on chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).

The authors hypothesized that suppression of the BCR-Abl oncogene is likely a key positive regulator of LSC survival within “hypoxic” SCNs. To analyse the various mechanisms and responses that CML cells demonstrate within SCNs, the authors studied correlations between varied oxygen and glucose concentrations with the amount of BCR-Abl produced. All tests were performed using two human CML cell lines, K562 and KCL22. Testing conditions were precisely controlled to mimic the SCN environment as close as possible. Using a Hypoxystation supplied by Don Whitely Scientific, a water-saturated atmosphere comprising of 0.1% O2, 94.9% N2 and 5% CO2 was generated and maintained.

The research conducted and documented by Cheloni et al. has provided great insight into several key regulatory mechanisms associated with leukemic stem cells as well as an explanation for their notorious reputation for having high relapse rates. Additionally, they established that the triggering of oncogene suppression associated with CML is due to severe energy restriction rather than simply the “adaptation to hypoxia.”

The Don Whitley Scientific Hypoxystation provides the user incredible flexibility as it can control oxygen down to 0.1% while providing a temperature and humidity controlled environment with ample working space. The extreme precision provided by the Hypoxystation was critical to the collection of accurate and reliable data when recreating the demanding environment that comprises SCNs. The atmosphere is constantly monitored and adjusted by the real-time feedback system to ensure accuracy and ISO class 3 clean room HEPA filtration is also available for long term cell culture applications.

Choose your atmosphere with the Hypoxystation hypoxia chamber. Accurately control O2, CO2, Temperature and Humidity.   

Hypoxystation is the only hypoxic chamber purpose built for physiological cell culture research. Specifically designed to create normoxic, hypoxic and anoxic conditions within a controlled and sustained workstation environment, this hypoxic incubator is ideal for research requiring the ability to accurately control O2, CO2, temperature and humidity. The Whitley Internal HEPA Filtration System provides a particle-free internal environment that exceeds ISO 14644 class 3 clean atmosphere.  With such accurate control and the ability to manipulate cells in situ without altering the incubation environment, research into cell biology can be performed over a comprehensive range of oxygen tensions with precision. Don Whitley Scientific offer the following range of Hypoxystations:

                                                                                   

Hypoxystation H35

Hypoxystation H45

Hypoxystation H85

Hypoxystation H135

i2 Instrument Workstation

Application possibilities for Hypoxystation are endless; it is being used for research into tumour microenvironment, hypoxia pathways and HIF signalling, in vitro modelling of in situ environments, cancer cell metastasis, angiogenesis, and many other fields where cells may benefit from a more physiological atmosphere.

 

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Why Choose a Whitley Workstation?

There are many reasons to choose a Whitley Workstation when it comes to Anaerobic, Hypoxic or Microaerophilic work. We can discuss these with you anytime, but we also have plenty of satisfied customers who have expressed why using a Whitley Workstation improves their working methods and results.

Over the years, customers have supplied us with many testimonials about their Don Whitley Scientific products. From these we can see that not only have Whitley Workstations become approved by fantastic researchers worldwide, but we can also help promote the amazing work that is done by our customers.

Dr Vaibhao Janbandhu at the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute (VCCR) in Sydney, Australia uses a Whitley H35 Hypoxystation in his work on finding new ways to stimulate heart regeneration during ageing and after heart attack. He uses his H35 Hypoxystation to isolate, culture and characterise adult cardiac stem cells. In Dr Janbandhu’s words the H35 is “an integral part of the project to advance the project aims”.

In this video testimonial, Jane Freeman at Leeds General Infirmary explains how her Whitley A95 Workstation improves the working methods in her Clostridium difficile research. Jane reports that she and her team are able to use the workstation for “several hours at a time in relative comfort” and that the workstation is able to house all the technical equipment her team requires. This allows “the whole experiment to be performed in optimum conditions without introducing air at all”. Jane explains that “reliability, versatility and space are the significant benefits of the workstations in our work on Clostridium difficile“.

The Institute of Cancer Research in London is one of the world’s most influential research institutes, with an outstanding record of achievement dating back more than 100 years. At the Institute, George Poulogiannis uses a combination of Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation (with Seahorse XF Analyzer) and Whitley H35 Hypoxystation in his research into breast cancer. Hypoxia is a key factor in the “Hallmarks of Cancer” and this team are studying the role of hypoxia in cell invasion and metastasis, oncogene-induced senescence and resistance to current treatment options. The i2 and H35 replicate a physiologically relevant atmosphere for these studies, enabling consistent and reliable results. This combination of Workstations is also used by Dr Ayse Latif, who is researching gynaecological cancers at The University of Manchester.

Don Whitley Scientific would like to take this opportunity to thank all customers who have provided testimonials. If you would be interested in supplying a testimonial, please contact Alex_Rhodes@dwscientific.co.uk.

Take a look at our other testimonials