DON WHITLEY SCIENTIFIC – THE LEADING INTERNATIONAL SUPPLIER TO THE MICROBIOLOGY AND TISSUE CULTURE INDUSTRIES


Contact Us +44 (0) 1274 595728 sales@dwscientific.co.uk

Follow Don Whitley Scientific

Posts Tagged ‘hypoxia workstation’

Whitley Hypoxystation

World Heart Day: Hypoxia in Cardiovascular Disease Research

Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, is responsible for approximately 1 in 3 deaths in the US, according to the American Heart Association. World Heart Day on 29 September serves as a platform to educate people on how to take control of their heart health.

Don Whitley Scientific and our US/Canadian distributor HypOxygen would like to take this opportunity to highlight cardiovascular research being carried out around the world – and to say “thank you for being committed to our health.”

Adverse cardiac remodeling after infarction exacerbates myocardial ischemia and increases the likelihood of heart failure. Revuelta-Lopez et al. in Spain present new data showing that in the hypoxic areas of the infarct zone, expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is linked to activation of Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) through Pyk2 phosphorylation, and propose that LRP1 modulation may be a very effective pharmacological target in heart disease. Their H35 Hypoxystation with its controlled low oxygen environment creates physiologically more relevant parameters for cell culture, mimicking ischemia/reperfusion events.

Hypothesizing that Tumor necrosis factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand plays a role in ischemic injury during acute myocardial infarction, Jiang et al. have found evidence for a novel immune regulatory mechanism involving TRAIL, ER stress and NF-κB signaling pathways. Culturing their cells in the Hypoxystation H35 at 0.3% oxygen allowed the lab to simulate the ischemia/reperfusion processes that cause cardiomyocyte loss and increase mortality in Coronary Heart Disease.

Hypoxia in the embryonic environment supports maintenance of a primitive glycosaminoglycan-rich heart valve matrix, the specific composition of which determines proper function, and as hypoxia decreases after birth, the extracellular matrix matures. Amofa et al. at Cincinnati’s Children’s Medical Center, using the H35 Hypoxystation, provide new data that exposure of adult heart tissue to hypoxia induces hyaluronan remodeling, GAG accumulation, and degeneration of the extracellular matrix in the heart valve, effects that are implicated in Myxomatous mitral valve disease.

Dr. Michael Cross, Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology Department, University of Liverpool, says of his work with cardiac spheroids : “The H35 allows us to generate oxygen levels that reflect the in vivo physiology these cells would be exposed to. We chose the Hypoxystation with its oxygen profiling feature, which allows us to recreate cycles of ischemia, where oxygen levels typically sink to 1-3%”.

Revuelta-Lopez et al 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image from: Revuelta-Lopez et al. “Relationship among LRP1 expression, Pyk2 phosphorylation and MMP-9 activation in left ventricular remodelling after myocardial infarction” J Cell Mol Med. 2017 Sep;21(9):1915-1928

 

Amofa et al 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hypoxia increases GAGs, Sox9 nuclear localization and Hyal2 expression in cAVOCs.

Image from: Amofa et al. (2017) “Hypoxia promotes primitive glycosaminoglycan-rich extracellular matrix composition in developing heart valves” Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2017 Aug 25:ajpheart.00209.2017

 

 

 

dws-stand

Don Whitley Scientific Exhibit at Key Cardiovascular Meeting

Don Whitley Scientific recently attended the BSCR (British Society of Cardiovascular Research) Annual Meeting, held this year at The University Of Leeds. The focus of the meeting was on “Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes” and the event featured fantastic talks and poster presentations from renowned figures in Cardiovascular research.

The Don Whitley Scientific stand featured a H45 Hypoxystation. The H45 is a large, three port cell culture workstation, ideal for replicating physiologically relevant atmospheres through the control of oxygen, temperature and humidity. Working in a Hypoxystation means cell cultures and other samples are within a stable atmosphere that matches the specific microenvironments that exist inside the human body, meaning research results are dependable and accurate.

 

At The University of Liverpool, Dr Michael Cross is conducting cardiovascular research using a Whitley H35 HEPA Hypoxystation as he looks at Low Oxygen Drug Toxicity Testing in Cardiac Spheroids

The Whitley Hypoxystation range can be viewed here

2016-05-18 15.10.56

Whitley H35 Hypoxystation used in heart regeneration project

Dr Vaibhao Janbandhu is a Postdoctoral Research Scientist at the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute (VCCRI) in Sydney. He has been in contact with Don Whitley Scientific to explain how his lab’s work has benefited from the use of a Whitley H35 Hypoxystation. Vaibhao uses the Hypoxystation to isolate, culture and characterise adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs).

Dr Janbandhu had already been using a H35 that was set up at the institute for almost three years before he got his own unit installed last year. Specifically, his project is to find new ways to stimulate heart regeneration during ageing and after heart attack. For this he needs a way to isolate, culture and characterise adult CSCs. In Vaibhao’s words the H35 Hypoxystation seems well suited for this application: “the DWS Hypoxystation provides a highly stabilised environment in which levels of oxygen, carbon dioxide, temperature and humidity are precisely controlled and it will be an integral part of the project to advance the project aims”.

Vaibhao explains that mammalian stem cells reside in a specialised cellular microenvironment. This niche and the stem cell niche is characterised by a low partial oxygen pressure. This hypoxic niche protects stem cells from deleterious effects of O2 on proteins and DNA. These precise conditions are essential for Dr Janbandhu’s work as they accurately replicate the in vivo environment.

His work also see benefits when comparing the use of a Hypoxystation as opposed to using a CO2 incubator. Typically, cell culture work involves methods which include isolating cells under their usual physiologically relevant conditions and then working with them in “bench-top conditions” where cells are exposed to non-physiological oxygen. This can then lead to altered hypoxic response, metabolism, reactive oxygen species and DNA damage response. This metabolic stress introduces unknown outcomes and may lead to results inconsistent with physiological processes. Therefore, the precise control of oxygen levels in cell culture has been shown to be vital for reproducible and physiologically relevant results, transforming the working environment in Vaibhao’s lab.

As well as the precise controlling of conditions, Vaibhao likes the remote access feature on his H35 Hypoxystation. The remote access allows Vaibhao to log into his Hypoxystation’s touchscreen control whilst away from the unit, offering increased flexibility in his working methods. Additionally, he likes how he can view operating conditions, set parameters and change access levels remotely.

Dr Janbandhu opted to purchase a Hypoxystation from Don Whitley Scientific for the level of service and specification we were able to provide in Australia. Other companies either couldn’t fulfil configuration requirements and didn’t provide sales and or service in Australia. Don Whitley Scientific’s office in Australia, provides both fantastic sales and service nationwide. Vaibhao also states that from “discussion with other research groups across the world we felt confident to go for a DWS Hypoxystation”.

Dr Vaibhao Janbandhu has this to say about Don Whitley Scientific Pty Ltd: “I would like to thank your company personnel at the customer services division in Australia for their excellent support. Your Sales & Service Manager in Australia, Grant Shallcross, took care of all my queries in a jiffy!”. Vaibhao added that the funding for the purchase came from the James N Kirby Foundation and the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute.

2016-05-18 15.13.27

Whitley H35 Hypoxystation

TRACER mimics oxygen and nutrient gradients in tumours

Our US/Canada distributor, HypOxygen, wanted to find out more about Whitley H35 and H45 Hypoxystation customer Brad Wouters’ recent research, especially the newly published paper describing his three-dimensional tumour TRACER project, published as “A three-dimensional engineered tumour for spatial snapshot analysis of cell metabolism and phenotype in hypoxic gradients“ (Rodenhizer et al., Nature Materials 15, 227–234, 2016).

Interview with Brad Wouters, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto.  March 4, 2016

“The paper describes a new device that enables us to create naturally occurring oxygen gradients, such as the ones found in tumours. The TRACER (engineered tumour roll for analysis of cellular environment and response) developed by Alison McGuigan of the University of Toronto is basically an engineered tumour that is assembled by rolling a single-component biocomposite sheet. Respiration-induced oxygen and metabolite gradients are established inside the device, so it’s an alternative to other 3D models such as spheroids. The benefit is that the TRACER rolls can be rapidly disassembled, enabling you to interrogate the biological phenotypes or properties, characteristics, and metabolites of the cells in those defined locations within the gradient, in the six layers of the tracer. The cells can be removed in a variety of ways; you can remove the cells in a viable way and process them as you would any cells, to do flow cytometry, metabolomics, cell survival, proliferation.

Read more

DWS Demo Truck

Liverpool Mini-Exhibition

Cell culture in physiologically relevant conditions – Mini-Exhibition

Don Whitley Scientific today announced the first in a series of UK events using our sophisticated, new demonstration truck. Now you don’t have to travel to see how your research can benefit from better control of oxygen, carbon dioxide, temperature and humidity, we can come to you.

——————————————–

 

Don Whitley Scientific today announced the first in a series of UK events using our sophisticated, new demonstration truck. Now you don’t have to travel to see the latest innovations in controlled atmosphere cell culture workstations, we can come to you:

  • High resolution control of O2, CO2, temperature, and humidity
  • Automated sensor calibration
  • High classification HEPA filtration
  • User programmed oxygen profiling
  • Automated sterile humidification system
  • Workstations of increasing size and complexity for housing instruments

Staff and students at the University of Liverpool are invited to the Don Whitley Scientific mobile laboratory to find out how the latest innovations in modified atmosphere cell culture workstations could improve their research.

This MINI-EXHIBITION will take place on

9nd March 2016 from 10am to 3pm

at

Biosciences Car Park, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, L69 7ZB

For those whose research involves cell/tissue culture and who want to maintain physiologically relevant conditions in which to culture and manipulate cells, then the Whitley Hypoxystation should be of interest. Whitley Workstations allow users to control their cell culture atmosphere in a more accurate and reliable manner when compared to conventional incubators – increased accuracy and reliability that is reflected in experimental results. A number of researchers at the University of Liverpool are already making use of Whitley workstations to facilitate their research:

Dr Michael Cross in the Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology uses his H35 to simulate the physiological in-vivo oxygen levels when he cultures cardiac spheroids in-vitro. He also makes use of the oxygen profiling system to lower the oxygen levels for set periods of time in order to simulate ischemia/reperfusion.

Dr Violane See in the Institute for Integrative Biology uses her H35 to simulate the hypoxic tumour microenvironment in order to study the link between tumour hypoxia and metastasis.

 

Some of the research areas in which our other customers are working include:

Glioblastoma – Autoimmune Diseases – Reproductive and Perinatal Biology –
Cell Invasion and Metastasis – Drug Toxicity – Metabolism – Inflammation –
Stem Cells – Molecular Biology – Cancer Research

Coffee and Pastries


Attendees will be able to share coffee and pastries and find out how using a Whitley Workstation could improve their research.

We will also be holding a free prize draw to win a Nespresso U Coffee Machine by Magimix.

 

 

 

ISSCR 2015 DWS Stand

Stem Cell Research in Stockholm

 

Stem cell researchers from all over the world are currently convening in Stockholm for the annual meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR). Topics covered in the event range from pluripotency and differentiation through regeneration to disease modelling and tissue engineering. All aspects of reprogramming and stem cell maintenance on the one hand, and differentiation on the other hand, are intricately influenced by the cellular microenvironment. Oxygenation is a crucial parameter throughout all these processes, both in the natural stem cell niche and during culture in the lab. Low oxygen promotes efficient expansion of stem cells in culture while supporting maintenance of the stem cell phenotype. Hypoxia can increase the proliferation rate and inhibit senescence of stem cells, and promote healing directly and through paracrine effects. Therapies utilizing hypoxic cells exhibit improved homing and engraftment to the target tissues as compared to normoxia. Hypoxia is a major determinant of many diverse aspects of stem cell biology.
Don Whitley Scientific will be at the event exhibiting their largest cell culture workstation to date – the Whitley H135 Hypoxystation.

ISSCR Logo

Hypoxia and stem cells

Later this month, the international stem cell research community will be travelling to Stockholm for the upcoming International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) meeting covering diverse topics from reprogramming and pluripotency of stem cells through tissue engineering and organ regeneration to therapy with stem cells.

Whitley H135 Hypoxystation

Whitley H135 Hypoxystation

Hypoxia is a crucial parameter determining the fate and development of stem cells, which leads Don Whitley Scientific to exhibit the Hypoxystation controlled environment workstation for low oxygen cell culture (see us on stand no. B15:33). Dr. Burga Kalz Fuller, Product Manager at our American distributor, HypOxygen, has summarized five recent papers delineating the role of hypoxia in stem cell research:

Read more

Hypoxia and Immunity

Whitley H35 HypoxystationThe upcoming Cell symposium “Cancer, Inflammation and Immunity” will shine a spotlight on research delineating the complex cross-talk between inflammatory processes, immune response and the development of cancer diseases. Don Whitley Scientific will be exhibiting the Whitley H35 Hypoxystation (pictured right), a controlled environment workstation for low oxygen cell culture, at the meeting on June 14-16 in Sitges, Spain.

As we look forward to the conference, Dr Burga Kalz Fuller, Product Manager at our American distributor, HypOxygen, has summarized five interesting and recent papers concerning hypoxia and its role in immunology and cancer research:

1.         “A mechanism of hypoxia-mediated escape from adaptive immunity in cancer cells” Barsoum et al, Cancer Res. 2014 Feb 1;74(3):665-74

In cancer cells exposed to hypoxia, HIF-1α induced expression of programmed cell death ligand PD-L1, which increased the cells’ resistance to CTL-mediated lysis and contributed to tumoral immune escape. This effect was blocked through administration of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), an agonist of nitric oxide signalling, suggesting that NO mimetica inhibiting PD-L1 may present a novel cancer therapy strategy.
2.         “HIF-mediated innate immune responses: cell signaling and therapeutic implications” Harris et al., Hypoxia 2014:2 47–58

Host defense through innate immune cells takes place in a low oxygen environment where functions as diverse as cytokine secretion and pathogen phagocytosis are modulated by HIF’s. This review summarises the roles of HIF’s in acute and chronic immune response and gives a perspective on therapies targeting the HIF pathway.

3.         “Identification of CD300a as a new hypoxia-inducible gene and a regulator of CCL20 and VEGF production by human monocytes and macrophages” Raggi et al., Innate Immunity October 2014 vol. 20 no. 7 721-734

Hypoxia is characteristic for sites of inflammation and lesion, and monocytes and other immune cells accumulating in these hypoxic areas are specifically stimulated by the low oxygen environment. Raggi et al. investigated the hypoxic transcriptome and describe members of the CD300 superfamily of immunoregulatory cell surface receptors which are up-regulated in hypoxia.

4.         “HIF Transcription Factors, Inflammation, and Immunity”, Palazon et al., Immunity 41, October 16, 2014

Hypoxia-signaling pathways which trigger HIF expression act in the immune system to modulate host immune function. In this review, Palazon et al. describe the myriad ways oxygen sensing regulates innate and adaptive immunity.

5.         “Hypoxia attenuates the proinflammatory response in colon cancer cells by regulating IκB”, Mueller-Edenborn, Oncotarget April 2015

Mueller-Edenborn’s group shed light on signalling pathways regulating hypoxia and inflammatory responses, which exhibit a surprising degree of cross-talk in colon cancer. Hypoxia attenuated proinflammatory responses by inhibiting translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus, demonstrating yet again that both these aspects of the tumour microenvironment influence therapy response.

TShirt for Survey

Free T-Shirt: Hypoxia Research

 

Do you culture cells in hypoxic conditions? For a limited time only, you can earn a free t-shirt by taking a few minutes to answer our questions and help us to better fulfil your cell culture needs.

We want to know what your research focus is, how you conduct your cell culture and how you think oxygen content might influence aspects of your cell culture.

Please click here to complete a very short online form.

Airlock Tray Storage

New: Airlock Tray Storage Racks

We have produced a new airlock tray storage rack for our Anaerobic and Hypoxic Workstations, which can hold up to 4 airlock trays.

Manufactured from powder-coated aluminium, these racks are lightweight and durable, and a convenient way to organise Petri dishes, tissue culture flasks, consumables and other small items.

You don’t even need a workstation fitted with a removable front, as the rack can be introduced into the chamber through the airlock. No excuse for an untidy workspace now!

For more information, please contact us and quote product code A06928.

Airlock Tray Storage