DON WHITLEY SCIENTIFIC – THE LEADING INTERNATIONAL SUPPLIER TO THE MICROBIOLOGY AND TISSUE CULTURE INDUSTRIES


Contact Us +44 (0) 1274 595728 sales@dwscientific.co.uk

Follow Don Whitley Scientific

Overseas Exhibitions

Dan Partridge, iGEM participant

DWS Supports Nottingham iGem Team

Don Whitley Scientific Limited were recently approached by Professor Nigel Minton from the University of Nottingham requesting some sponsorship to enter a global competition. The International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) Foundation is an independent, non-profit organization dedicated to education and competition, the advancement of synthetic biology, and the development of an open, collaborative community. iGEM runs the iGEM Competition – an international team competition made up of predominantly undergraduate students interested in the field of synthetic biology.

We spoke to one of the team – Daniel Partridge (pictured below) – to find out more about the competition and what it means to him personally. Dan is a 3rd year BSc student studying Biotechnology. We asked him:

Can you explain the project you are working on? Our project centres on the Clostridium difficile bacteriophage. With the increase in antibiotic resistance, we need to develop a more precise method to attack the pathogen C. difficile, as this bacterium can cause unpleasant and sometimes serious bowel problems.

Do you play a specific role in the iGEM team? There are 10 students and five supervisors in the team. We started out with specific roles. There are three lab teams: two are trying to reduce toxin production of C.difficile using genetic engineering techniques – RNA interference and CRISPR dCas9 – and the third group is the promoter team (contribution). The non-lab teams look at human/outreach, financing, computing and modelling.

How many teams are in the competition? There are about 400 teams across the world.

What do you think you will get out of the competition personally? I am going into my 3rd year so the opportunities this competition will provide to get into problem solving and thinking-on-the-spot will be invaluable in my future career. With the sheer number of scientists that will be in Boston, it will be a fantastic networking opportunity. I understand that we may also be given the chance to look round the laboratories of some organisations in the area.iGEM team photo

Don Whitley Scientific recognises the importance of initiatives like this that strive to further scientific breakthroughs and we are happy to support the team. We wish Dan and the team the very best of luck in the competition and hope that their project brings home the grand prize. Click here to learn more about SBRC Nottingham.

More About iGEM

iGEMers state that they are building a better world by solving problems with the help of synthetic biology. The iGEM Competition inspires nearly 6,000 students each year to work in teams to address unique challenges in their local communities.

They celebrate team achievements at the annual Giant Jamboree by showcasing projects from participating teams and awarding medals, prizes, and the grand prize, the BioBrick trophies.

Their aim is to inspire responsible innovation through efforts in biosafety, biosecurity and public outreach.

iGEM Community

The iGEM community is made up of international trailblazers from over 45 countries around the world.

In 2017 iGEM launched the After iGEM program. This program supports over 30,000 iGEMers – students and instructors – who have gone through the competition since its inception in 2004. This global network is leading the field, taking what they learned in the competition and expanding it to continue to build a better world.

UoN_Primary_Logo_CMYK (2)

gasbio finished 4 (2)

 

 

 

 

 

Whitley A95 Workstation for Jin Sung on final test

End of an Era for Don Whitley Scientific

Production comes to a close in Shipley

The last Whitley Workstation to be manufactured by Don Whitley Scientific in Shipley has now rolled off the production line. This particular order was an A95 Anaerobic Workstation ordered by Jin Sung Unitech, Republic of Korea.

JS Unitech LogoAccording to Junghoon Hong of Jin Sung, “We had no idea that in placing this order, we would be commissioning the last ever workstation to be built at Don Whitley Scientific in Shipley. We have been distributing Whitley Workstations for 19 years and are very proud to have ordered the last one from the Shipley production line.”

Paul Walton added, “I am extremely happy that we are moving to bigger and better premises that will provide the opportunity to improve our production processes. Victoria Works will provide considerably more warehousing capacity plus new offices, a bespoke production area, service centre, R&D mezzanine and improved staff facilities including a large, fully fitted, air-conditioned canteen. There will also be a new product showroom where customers can view demonstrations of the latest anaerobic and hypoxic workstation technology.

“An element of nostalgia is, however, creeping in as we draw close to the move date. We have been manufacturing in  Shipley for over 40 years and I have seen many changes in those four decades. We will, however, focus on the positives and move the business forward to face the challenges of the next 40 years!”

When Don Whitley Scientific began making workstations, it was purely for the UK market. We now have over 4,000 workstations in over 50 countries.

It might be the end of one era but another, exciting one begins at our new premises in Bingley.

removal van

Don Whitley Scientific to Move to Bingley

After 40 years of manufacturing in Shipley, Don Whitley Scientific Limited has announced that the company will move to new premises in Bingley.

 

 

 

 

Managing director, Paul Walton, explains:Paul Walton
“Our business has expanded considerably, particularly over the last 10 years, and despite having purchased numbers 16 and 18 Otley Road, we have still outgrown our current facilities. When Victoria Works came up for sale, providing 48,100 sq ft, we knew this would be the right move for us. The Bingley premises will provide us with the space to organise ourselves more efficiently and still have room to expand.”

 

 

 

The new premises, just off Bradford Road, is undergoing a major refit (by Eclipse Interiors) to make it suitable for the company’s needs. There will be considerably more warehousing capacity plus new offices, a bespoke production area, service centre, R&D mezzanine and improved staff facilities including a large, fully fitted, air-conditioned canteen. There will also be a new product showroom where customers can view demonstrations of the latest anaerobic and hypoxic workstation technology.

 

 

The office for sales, service and marketing

The office for sales, service and marketing

Warehouse area

Warehouse area

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product showroom

Product showroom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The move will take place from 13 to 17 June so the business will be operational from Bingley on Monday, 18 June.

 

asm microbe cropped

Microbiology International at ASM Microbe 2017

Don Whitley Scientific’s US distributor, Microbiology International, will be exhibiting at the upcoming American Society for Microbiology annual conference. The event, known as ASM Microbe, will be held in New Orleans from June 1st to June 5th. Microbiology International will be showcasing Don Whitley Scientific products at Booth 2837.

The ASM continues to be the international leader in advancing microbial sciences across the globe, boasting more than 50,000 members. The annual ASM Microbe conference gives delegates and exhibitors the chance to experience everything that is happening in microbiology and connect with bright minds across the broad scope of the industry. The five day programme includes keynote speakers, poster sessions, workshops and also an optional city tour of New Orleans.

The Microbiology International stand will feature the Whitley A55 Anaerobic Workstation. Representatives will be available to explain why this is the best option when it comes to a range of microbiology applications. Two unique features of these workstations are the Instant Access Port System and Anaerobic Conditions Monitoring. The first ensures the workstation is easy and comfortable to work in whilst ACM ensures anaerobic conditions are monitored, providing consistently reliable results.

If you are at this event make sure you visit Booth 2837 to discuss how our product range could help you in your work.

capture

HypOxygen at Tumour Microenvironment Workshop in Miami

This article was written by Burga Kalz Fuller, join her and HypOxygen at the 15th International Tumour Microenvironment Workshop in Miami

In most cancers, the hypoxic microenvironment affects the development and progression of tumours, driving alterations in gene expression, metabolism and cell signalling, and significantly influencing the Hallmarks of Cancer. So what about in vitro cancer research, do culture parameters matter? Definitely! Numerous studies have shown that even very brief exposure to ambient oxygen levels and temperature significantly impacts cell culture, behaviour and function of cells in vitro.

HypOxygen will be exhibiting our Hypoxystation at the 15th International Tumour Microenvironment Workshop in Miami from 27th – 29th April. The special focus there is on “Hypoxia, Angiogenesis and Vasculature”, reflecting the critical importance of hypoxia in the context of cancer. With the Hypoxystation, cancer researchers have their finger on the pulse of physiological cell culture.

 

hypoxia

 

The Hypoxystation mimics the hypoxic conditions present in cancer, providing a closed workstation format with contiguous, stable low oxygen down to 0.1%. Precise oxygen, carbon dioxide, and humidity control within a temperature-controlled environment, as well as ample space for cellular manipulation, assays and microscopic observation, allow researchers to recreate physiological conditions. HEPA filtration, sterile steam humidification, and remote parameter monitoring are some of the features that make the Hypoxystation so unique.

Cancer research labs, who use a Hypoxystation to re-create hypoxic conditions in the tumour microenvironment, are publishing brilliant papers which demonstrate the influence of hypoxia on the Hallmarks of Cancer. Metabolic adaptation, sustained growth, resisting cell death, and angiogenesis are just some of the Hallmarks which are affected by hypoxia. Here are some recent highlights:

Hypoxystation users are showing that “culturing cells in ambient air, or ‘normoxia’ is far from physiological.

Visit HypOxygen at the 15th International Tumor Microenvironment Workshop in Miami

eccmid logo

See the WASPLab at ECCMID 2017 in Vienna

WASPLab to be shown at the forthcoming 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

Held in Vienna, this event brings together the world’s leading experts to discuss the latest developments in infectious diseases, infection control and clinical microbiology. The scientific programme features talks from key figures in antibiotic susceptibility testing, infection control and antimicrobial resistance.

Representatives from Don Whitley Scientific will be present on the Copan stand at this event to help promote WASPLab. WASPLab is the sophisticated barcode driven microbiology specimen processor and work-up system, moving samples from front end processing to full specimen management, automated incubation and digital microbiology.  With its modular design and small footprint, WASPLab can be customised to the unique needs of the lab.  The robotic plate management system, smart incubators and state-of-the-art image acquisition technology are changing the way labs work and opening the door for groundbreaking digital microbiology.

Don Whitley Scientific is one of the primary distributors of the WASPLab in the UK. We have installed a WASPLab at Leeds General Infirmary and will soon be installing a second system at Manchester Royal Infirmary. We invite you to come along and meet representatives from Don Whitley Scientific on Copan’s stand at this international event.

 

WASPLab

WASPLab

A35_Front_June2014_1000x1000

Cultivating the “Unculturables”

The oral bacteriome comprises about 700 species, most of them anaerobic and participating in symbiotic relationships with their human host and each other which are essential for overall health, not just of the mouth but also of the heart, the brain, and other organ systems. Up to one third of these bacteria have been characterised solely by culture-independent molecular methods such as 16S rRNA cloning, but have yet to be cultivated in vitro. These bacteria are so difficult to culture outside of their biofilm habitat because they rely on metabolic cooperation and intercellular signalling with the community.

Sonia Vartoukian and William Wade of Queen Mary University of London, using their Don Whitley Scientific Anaerobic Workstations, have been shining a bright light into the dark niches of the oral cavity for years. They have identified a novel species in a new genus, Fretibacterium fastidiosum, through co-culture with other oral bacteria cultured in the anaerobic workstation. More recently, they were able to isolate five novel strains from subgingival plaque, using a combination of community culture with helper strains and supplementation with siderophores as growth supplements. The bacteria are surprisingly agile in adapting to changes in their co-dependent habitat, as long as they are provided with the signals and factors they themselves have lost the ability to synthesize. Over the course of up to 21 day culture of the samples, Vartoukian and Wade were fastidious about not exposing the cultures to air, using plates that were pre-reduced in the workstation’s anaerobic atmosphere and making sure to minimise time spent outside of the workstation. The Whitley Anaerobic Workstation makes it easy to work with sensitive cultures. The 10mm thick annealed acrylic, patented use of Anotox, rapid transfer airlock, and easy-to-use sleeve gassing system ensure a robust and strictly anaerobic atmosphere.

 

Image from the website of Yihong Li of the Department of Dentistry, NYU

Image from the website of Yihong Li of the Department of Dentistry, NYU

 

On the other side of the Atlantic, Microbiology International distributes the Don Whitley Scientific anaerobic workstation to North American groups researching the oral bacteriome in physiology and disease. Dr. Yihong Li at New York University Department of Dentistry uses his A35 workstation “to facilitate cutting-edge research in clinical microbiology, antimicrobial treatment evaluation, and infectious disease identification.” The A35 can accommodate up to 600 90 mm plates and features bare-handed access to a consistent and strictly anaerobic environment, reliably monitored by the Anaerobic Conditions Monitoring System. Dr. Li’s research on dental caries has shown that the anaerobic environment is essential for colonization by oral lactobacilli. His group’s large-scale studies of the diversity of lactobacilli associated with severe early childhood caries have demonstrated the necessity to provide a range of anaerobic and microaerophilic niche environments in order to capture the complexity of Lactobacillus variables.

READ MORE

Dr. Li’s group will be presenting new research on oral biofilms at the AADR conference.

Visit Microbiology International at  the AADR/IADR meeting in San Francisco on 22-25 March to experience anaerobic workstations for yourself! 

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Molecular Targeting of Hypoxia in Radiotherapy

Most solid tumours exhibit areas of both chronic and acute hypoxia, all of them evolving dynamically as a function of cellular growth, vascularisation, oxygen consuming metabolism and therapy response. Tumour hypoxia, generally far below 1% oxygen, correlates with increased recurrence rates and decreased survival rates in most cancers, so the recent review by Hypoxystation users Rey et al. describing “Molecular Targeting of Hypoxia in Radiotherapy” gives a valuable overview of the mechanisms cancer cells have developed to respond to hypoxia.

Dr. Rey of the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto, Canada, and his co-authors Luana Schito, Marianne Koritzinsky and Brad Wouters have contributed vastly to our knowledge about the cellular response to hypoxia in the context of tumour behavior. Since 2009, they have acquired four Hypoxystations for their lab, in order to culture cells under conditions which authentically mimic the physiological environment of cancer. The Hypoxystation provides a closed workstation format for rigorous control of oxygen, CO2, temperature and humidity, facilitating accurate regulation of cell culture conditions as the in vivo tumour situation is simulated.

 

Clipboard01

 

In their 2016 review, Rey et al. describe the cellular response to the complex interplay of temporal and spatial variations in oxygen levels, and the rippling effects exerted on vascular, stromal and immunological responses.

 

Brad Wouters quote

By Burga Kalz Fuller, HypOxygen

H45_HEPA_1000x1000

Hypoxia and Tumor Metabolism in Whistler

Information on an upcoming exhibition in Whistler for HypOxygen. Words by Dr Burga Kalz Fuller.

At 2140 feet in Whistler, BC, the air will be getting thinner at the Keystone Symposia on “Adaptations to Hypoxia in Physiology and Disease” joint with the meeting on “Tumour Metabolism: Mechanisms and Targets”. But after all, hypoxia is what we do at HypOxygen, so we are very excited to be spending time at altitude with old friends and new ones on March 5-9.

At the Keystone Symposia in Whistler, HypOxygen will be exhibiting Whitley Hypoxystations for low oxygen cell culture under in vivo conditions. Conceived as an incubator workstation, but allowing gloveless access “to avoid spikes of normoxia” for cancer cells accustomed to very low oxygen, the Hypoxystation enables researchers to culture and manipulate cells growing at consistent oxygen, CO2, humidity and temperature. Another member of the Hypoxystation family, the i2 Instrument Workstation, was developed specifically to house instrumentation such as the Agilent Seahorse XF Analyzer for metabolism assays at hypoxia.

Since seeing is believing, we are greatly looking forward to talks and posters by a number of researchers who use Hypoxystations for their hypoxic cell culture. The broad range of these researchers’ presentations clearly illustrates how closely oxygen availability is linked to cancer cell behavior and metabolism, as the Hallmarks of Cancer are influenced and even determined by hypoxia in the tumour environment. These Hypoxystation users will be presenting data in Whistler:

  • Nicholas Denko, Ohio State University, USA
    Hypoxic Regulation of Mitochondrial Function
  • Almut Schulze, University of Würzburg/Theodor-Boveri Institute, Germany
    Targeting Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in Cancer
  • Janine T. Erler, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
    Hypoxia-Driven ECM Remodelling during Cancer Progression
  • Navdeep S. Chandel, Northwestern University, USA
    Why Mammalian Cells Respire?
  • Sara M. Timpano, University of Guelph, Canada
    Human Cells Cultured Under Physiological Oxygen Utilize a Different Mode of Translation Initiation, Have Higher Proliferation Rates, Less Oxidized DNA and More Tubular Mitochondria
  • Karen H. Vousden, Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, UK
    A Role for p53 in the Adaptation to Metabolic Stress
  • Cormac Taylor, University College Dublin, Ireland
    The Role of Hypoxia in Immunity and Inflammation
  • Eyal Gottlieb, Technion Integrated Cancer Center, Israel
    Metabolic Dependencies of Leukemic Stem Cells
  • Bradly G. Wouters, University Health Network, Canada
    ULK1 Regulates Oxygen Metabolism, Hypoxia Tolerance and Is a Therapeutic Target in Pancreatic Cancer
  • Ester M. Hammond, University of Oxford, UK
    Ribonucleotide Reductase Favors the RRM2B Subunit to Maintain DNA Replication in Hypoxia

 

Please stop by our exhibit at the Whistler Conference Center to learn more about the ways the Hypoxystation can recreate the tumour environment for your cancer research. We also have a “heart-warming” gift for you!

 

Hallmarks of Cancer

capture

Hypoxia and the Hallmarks of Cancer

Therapeutic Targeting of Hypoxia and HIFs in Cancer. Dr Burga Kalz Fuller from US distributor HypOxygen has summarised this study that outlines the Hallmarks of Cancer.

“Tumour hypoxia and HIFs affect most of the cancer hallmarks… and contribute to chemo- and radiotherapy resistance.” In their review from 2016, Wigerup, Pahlman and Bexell of Lund University in Sweden discuss how hypoxia inducible factors HIFs regulate the hypoxic microenvironment in cancer, and the therapeutic strategies that are being developed to improve patients’ prognosis. Dr. Sven Pahlman’s lab has been using the H35 Hypoxystation for more than 5 years, to research SCLC and neuroblastoma, and their data is contributing to the understanding of the role of oxygen levels in the progression of cancer.

Hypoxia and HIF-1α and 2α expression in cancer usually signify a worse prognosis, but most hypoxia-induced transcriptional, translational, and epigenetic changes are cell-type specific. Many effects engendered by hypoxia are mediated directly or indirectly via HIF pathways, and most are causative of the iconic “Hallmarks of Cancer” that Hanahan and Weinberg introduced in 2000 and expanded in 2011. Hypoxia induces increased autophagy, apoptosis, and aberrant cell proliferation; neoangiogenesis mediated by VEGF and PDGF-β; proliferation of cancer stem cells; metabolic reprogramming to satisfy energy and synthetic requirements in proliferating cells; modulation of inflammation and immune responses; genomic instability through increased mutagenesis and diminished DNA repair; and metastasis as hypoxia induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and degradation of the extracellular matrix. Assaying the relationship between hypoxia and the Hallmarks of Cancer benefits significantly from the physiological atmosphere mimicked in the Hypoxystation, a closed-culture hypoxia workstation controlling gasses, temperature and humidity.


Visit Don Whitley Scientific and HypOxygen at

Keystone Adaptations to Hypoxia and Tumour Metabolism

Location: Whistler, BC  Date: 5th – 9th March

Sven Pahlman


In their review, Wigerup and Pahlman describe the role tumour hypoxia plays for cancer therapy and treatment resistance, as oxygen levels, production of reactive oxygen species ROS, and HIF activity are intertwined actors in the cancer battle. Any and all effects of hypoxia are cell-type specific; however, numerous studies indicate that HIF’s mediate chemoresistance, suggesting that HIF-1 and 2 inhibitors can effectively support cancer therapy. The authors state that “since hypoxia is a hallmark of solid tumours and mediates aggressive, metastatic, and resistant disease, it is arguably one of the most attractive therapeutic targets in cancer.” Strategies selectively targeting hypoxia for cancer therapy include hypoxia-activated prodrugs; inhibitors of HIF mRNA and protein expression; and inhibitors of downstream HIF signalling pathways such as VEGF. Effective drug research relies on authentic replication of the hypoxic environment for cell culture: the Hypoxystation used in the Pahlman lab is able to accommodate long-term assays with sterile steam humidification and HEPA clean air. The Hypoxystation concept “Choose your Atmosphere – Define your Environment” is the best way to ensure cell culture reflects physiology in cancer research and therapy.

Hypoxia is at the heart of the Hallmarks of Cancer, and results such as these from the Pahlman lab make the cancer research community hopeful that “HIF inhibition is likely to be a powerful therapeutic approach” to eradicate cancer.

 

Hallmarks of Cancer