DON WHITLEY SCIENTIFIC – THE LEADING INTERNATIONAL SUPPLIER TO THE MICROBIOLOGY AND TISSUE CULTURE INDUSTRIES


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Just Enough Oxygen: Cultivating Fastidious Pathogens in Microaerobic Workstations

A sustainable microaerophilic environment for incubation and manipulation of microbiological samples is crucial to culturing Campylobacter jejuni, Helicobacter pylori, and other fastidious pathogens. The ability to provide a customisable low level of oxygen for pathogens that can’t be cultivated successfully in ambient air or under strictly anaerobic conditions is a prerequisite for culturing these microorganisms.

The M series microaerobic workstations by Don Whitley Scientific, provide precise gas control of up to four gasses for a customisable low oxygen environment that doesn’t require expensive custom gas mixes. The entire temperature-controlled interior of the chamber serves as the work and incubation area, ensuring that growing cultures are never exposed to ambient conditions. Though the robust MACS VA workstations are still being used in many laboratories, we have invested considerable resources into developing the next generation microaerobic workstation, the M series, with increased atmospheric precision and a touchscreen interface. A range of sizes with capacities from ~600 to ~1400 plates will accommodate every workflow and space requirement. Options such as data logging, internal HEPA filtration, gas pressure monitoring and automated humidity control provide protection and accountability.

 

Clinical and research institutions worldwide are using our microaerophilic workstations to cultivate fastidious microorganisms with confidence.

Researchers are taking advantage of the stable microaerophilic atmosphere generated in our workstations to investigate the expression of H. pylori toxin in gastric pathology, integration of selected genes onto the C. jejuni chromosome, spectroscopic differentiation of foodborne Campylobacter strains and the epidemiology of antibiotic-resistance in Campylobacter in cattle.

2016    Horemans et al.    In-vivo evaluation of apocynin for prevention of Helicobacter  pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis

2016    Fontenete et al.    Fluorescence In Vivo Hybridization (FIVH) for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection in a C57BL/6 Mouse Model

2016    Sinnett et al.    Helicobacter pylori vacA transcription is genetically determined and stratifies the level of human gastric inflammation and atrophy

2016    Su et al.    Combination of OipA, BabA, and SabA as candidate biomarkers for predicting Helicobacter pylori-related gastric cancer

2016    Muhamadali  et al.    Chicken, beams, and Campylobacter : rapid differentiation of foodborne bacteria via vibrational spectroscopy and MALDI-mass spectrometry

2015    Jervis et al.    Chromosomal integration vectors allowing flexible expression of foreign genes in Campylobacter jejuni


Please feel free to contact us on +44 (0) 1274 595728 or email at sales@dwscientific.co.uk


WJGS with Metal Jar 1000x1000

Anaerobic Conditions in Jars – When funds don’t allow for a Whitley Workstation

One of the products in the Don Whitley Scientific range that sometimes gets overlooked is the Whitley Jar Gassing System (WJGS). When your budget or number of samples are just not enough to justify the purchase of even a small workstation, such as the DG250, the WJGS could be the answer.

Who could benefit from a WJGS?

Perhaps you only have a small number of plates to incubate. Perhaps you use gas packs. Perhaps you have a large number of jars already and don’t want to invest in a different solution. The WJGS can also be interesting for those who want to incubate small numbers of plates in different gas mixtures, as the WJGS can be connected to any gas mixture you want to use.

 

What are the cost implications?

The system is deceptively simple but highly effective and has a number of key benefits that have proven very popular. One of the main positives is the low running costs of the WJGS as opposed to the high cost of gas generating kits. Whilst there is an obvious initial investment in the purchase of a WJGS, the operating costs will save money in the longer term.

 

What are the features and benefits?

In addition to the cost savings that can be achieved, the WJGS provides many other benefits, including:

  • Create the perfect anaerobic conditions in your jars in just 2 minutes and for microaerophiles, in 15 seconds. The WJGS reduces the cost of creating microaerobic conditions by 98% and for anaerobic conditions by 89%.
  • Most types of jar can be adapted for use with the WJGS so if you already have a supply of jars, check with us to find out if they are suitable or can be adapted.
  • If you are a busy clinical lab with an anaerobic workstation but also have a few microaerophiles that you need to cultivate, you could attach a WJGS to the workstation and run a microaerobic cycle for those samples. It gives you additional flexibility as well a little extra anaerobic capacity at times of high demand.
  • Having samples in jars means that you can incubate at alternative temperatures than are possible inside a workstation.
  • You can be confident that a vacuum has been drawn and that the jar is sealed and airtight. With a gas pack you have no way of knowing whether the container is leaking.
  • There is an optional printer to provide full traceability.
  • If you need to open the jar to add more samples once you have activated a gas pack, it’s a waste as you will have to activate another gas pack. However, with jars you can open them as many times as you want and re-gas them for pennies.
  • The other benefit of the ability to re-gas so cheaply is that samples don’t have to be left on the bench for hours whilst enough are assembled to justify the use of a gas
  • A further consideration is that the used gas pack needs to be dealt with as hazardous waste. It needs autoclaving and disposing of accordingly. There is no such consideration with the WJGS.

Royal Stoke Hospital recently joined the long list of Whitley Jar Gassing System customers. The new system will replace the old style gassing system the hospital has been using and will improve their working methods and reduce costs.

 

 

The video below shows how easy the system is to use

 

So, if your budget won’t stretch to a Whitley Workstation or you want the flexibility to incubate in jars at different temperatures, the Whitley Jar Gassing System could be the perfect solution.

 


For further information, please call our sales team on +44 (0)1274 595728 or email sales@dwscientific.co.uk


 

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Culturing Cells in Ambient Air is Far From Physiological

The following words were provided by HypOxygen 

 

Based on the premise that the physiological range of oxygen in tissues is between 1- 8%, and pathologies from cancer to diabetes are characterised by much lower oxygen levels, researchers worldwide are cultivating their cell cultures in the Hypoxystation by Don Whitley Scientific. The Hypoxystation provides physiologically relevant conditions for cell culture and manipulation to ensure authentic behaviour of cells. User-defined parameters for temperature, CO2, O2 and humidity, plus the workstation format, where cells reside throughout the entire duration of the assays, minimise the extra-physiologic oxygen shock that is known to negatively impact cell metabolism and growth.

Numerous recent publications by our Hypoxystation users demonstrate that cell culture conditions which mimic physioxia, are essential in avoiding the significantly impaired growth rates, reduced lifespan, and altered molecular behaviour encountered in cells cultivated at ambient conditions. Oxygen levels in tissues are in constant flux; they change in response to functional status and blood delivery in the organs, and this too can be re-created in the Hypoxystation through programmed oxygen profiling.

Recent research using the Hypoxystation to investigate hypoxia inducible factors and the array of signalling pathways that regulate angiogenesis, metabolism, redox homeostasis, inflammation, and cell death, and the many other processes which enable the cellular and organismal response to hypoxia, “highlights the importance of oxygen as a cell culture parameter when making physiological inferences” (Timpano and Uniacke, 2016).

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From: Burr et al. (2016) “Mitochondrial Protein Lipoylation and the 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex Controls HIF1a Stability in Aerobic Conditions” Cell Metabolism 25, 740–752


To find out more about Hypoxystations or other DWS products, please call +44 (0) 1274 595728 or email sales@dwscientific.co.uk


 

WASP Touch in operation

How to Choose a Spiral Plater for Your Microbiology Laboratory

In this exclusive interview with rapidmicrobiology.com, Dr. Andrew Pridmore, Head of Microbiology at Don Whitley Scientific, discusses the benefits of using a spiral plater, what to look for in a system and how the new WASP Touch from Don Whitley Scientific (DWS) can help ensure your laboratory has consistent trackable, plating results.

Don Whitley Scientific introduced their first Spiral plater in 1978, why are they still relevant to today’s modern microbiology lab?
Much of the testing done back in 1978 when we first introduced spiral plating to the UK, is still relevant today. However, increased quality control measures have led to laboratories looking more to automation to help improve reproducibility and accuracy. Spiral plating offers a real reduction in the cost-per-test and standardises counting methods. Serial dilutions, for many users, can be eliminated, which in turn saves time, the cost of consumables and space in the incubator.

 

One of the key issues facing labs is calibration, validation and traceability, how can a spiral plater help with this?
Spiral plating techniques are recognised in the ISO 4833-2 standard. This is a general recognition of the use of spiral plating techniques in food microbiology and provides standardised procedures for their use.

Many spiral plating processes cannot be calibrated but with the WASP Touch, users can calibrate the delivery of the sample. There is also the option to include a bar code scanner. Traceability is facilitated with the inclusion of the Data Handling package for WASP Touch. This option records date, time, user, plate id, volume, date and at which volumes, date of the last start and finish position check, and date the last dye plate was performed. It also provides multi-level PIN-code protection. Data can be downloaded via USB in a format that can be loaded directly into Excel. An Ethernet connection for data transfer/service support is also included.

When choosing a new spiral plater what features should a buyer be looking for?
An automated spiral plater is ideal for those who regularly need to plate samples with a microbial content greater than 1,000 CFU/ml. Buyers should look for a plater that is flexible enough to process their particular samples, in terms of quantity and type of sample. For example, WASP Touch offers an Extended Volume Package to enable a wider range of volumes on a plate. Buyers should also consider the level of after-sales service, maintenance and support offered by the manufacturer. If you are opting for an automated method to speed up your processes, the last thing you want is for there to be a problem that causes an unacceptable level of downtime.

 

 

 

If a lab is getting an in-house demo for a spiral plater do you have any recommendations for how to test it?
At Don Whitley, we feel that any test should be as realistic as possible so would always look to perform a demo or trial with the actual samples the laboratory uses. After working through a demonstration with the customer, we would ideally arrange for them to have a spiral plater for an extended trial. This helps them to make a more informed purchase decision.

DWS have recently introduced a next generation spiral plater, what issues does this model address?
The new WASP Touch spiral plater simply modernises the process of spiral plating. The user interface is now a touchscreen with easy-to-use icons. Other features such as FlowSense ensure that the sample is correctly processed, alerting the user to any issues in time for corrections to be made; and AIMS, the intuitive software that guides users through the set-up routine.

If a lab wanted to introduce the new DWS spiral plater, what validation steps would be needed (is that the same if they were introducing spiral plating for the first time or upgrading to the new DWS system)?
WASP Touch, and spiral platers in general, require minimal validation because spiral plating methodology has already been validated and published in the international standard ISO 4833-2:2013.  The ISO standard includes methods for calibration and validation of the sample volumes deposited onto an agar plate by a spiral plater.

 


To find out more about WASP Touch or other DWS products, please call +44 (0) 1274 595728 or email at sales@dwscientific.co.uk


Scientist Working in Whitley Workstation

Practical & Clinical Microbiology of Anaerobes Course 2018

A 2 day residential course delivered by The UK Anaerobe Reference Unit, Public Health Wales, Cardiff

14-15 June 2018

Is it time to refresh your knowledge on the culturing, identification and clinical importance of anaerobes?

Are your staff wanting to learn from experts about the latest technologies and techniques?

• Recognised by the IBMS & RCPath CPD approved (11 credits)
• Invaluable preparation for FRCPath

Only 26 places available.

Cost: £375 + VAT (£355 + VAT for SAM members) which includes: one night accommodation at the Park Plaza Hotel, Cardiff, all meals and refreshments plus dinner on 14th June.


For more information please visit the Don Whitley Scientific website
www.dwscientific.co.uk/practicalmicrobiologycourse/

To reserve your place on this course, please contact:
Deborah Robinson at Don Whitley Scientific Limited on 01274 595728/sales@dwscientific.co.uk
Places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

 

PaCMan Course 2017

 

 

 

Biomedical Scientist_Clinical Microbiology of Anaerobes Course

Campylobactor Research with Microaerobic Workstations

The following words were provided by Microbiology International 

Cultivation of microaerophilic organisms from environmental niches such as Campylobacter species and Helicobacter pylori requires precise calibration of oxygen levels and other growth parameters. Microbiology International, North American distributor for Don Whitley Scientific, have been installing anaerobic and microaerobic incubation chambers for more than 20 years, and would like to introduce some of the research being carried out around the world. Click here to view our Microaerobic Workstations.

The complex interactions of microbial communities populating the human gastrointestinal tract with their host and with invading pathogens are paramount to safeguarding not only a healthy gut but also our general health. Microaerophilic bacterial species, such as Campylobacter jejuni, can cause gastro-enteric infections due to their ability to survive and grow in lower oxygen environments, which they encounter in the human gastro-intestinal tract. At the Ottawa Institute of Systems Biology, Dr. Alain Stintzi researches topics as diverse as iron homeostasis and oxidative stress and the competitive advantage of metabolizing L-Fucose in Campylobacter jejuni. Using a Don Whitley Scientific microaerobic workstation, Dr. Stinzi states that “One objective of our research is to understand how enteric pathogens such as Campylobacter jejuni acquire essential nutrients, adapt to the harsh conditions of the intestine and interact with the host’s microbiota to cause disease.”

At Ohio State University, Dr. Jeffrey Lejeune’s research is focused on prevention of diseases caused by food-borne pathogens in plants and animals, including C. jejuniE. coli O157, and Clostridium difficile. His work on antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter and other enteric pathogens has prompted the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation to recruit him to provide technical support and guidance in an international group working on antibiotic resistance. Don Whitley Scientific anaerobic and microaerobic workstations , sold in the US by Microbiology International, provide precise gas control for a sustainable low oxygen environment. Up to four gasses can be combined to create the ideal atmosphere for fastidious microorganisms.

In the UK, Dr. Andrew Grant at the University of Cambridge is investigating the Campylobacter jejuni secretome and diarrhoeal disease in a gnotobiotic piglet model, using the MACS VA500 and more recently, the M95 Microaerobic Workstation. His work to elucidate host-pathogen interaction and virulence strategies will yield new options for therapy and vaccination. Don Whitley Scientific will be there for him, and our other researchers, every step of the way.

 

From: Stahl et al. (2011) “L-fucose utilization provides Campylobacter jejuni with a competitive advantage“ Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Apr 26;108(17):7194-9

From: Stahl et al. (2011) “L-fucose utilization provides Campylobacter jejuni with a competitive advantage“ Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Apr 26;108(17):7194-9

From: Tang et al. (2017) “Rising fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter isolated from feedlot cattle in the United States” Scientific Reports 7: 494

From: Tang et al. (2017) “Rising fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter isolated from feedlot cattle in the United States” Scientific Reports 7: 494

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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IBMS Success for Don Whitley Scientific

Don Whitley Scientific once again exhibited at the Institute of Biomedical Science Congress. This bi-annual three day event is held at the International Convention Centre in Birmingham.

The event combines business, networking and social exchange and enables delegates to view new equipment and products, extend general awareness of techniques and technologies and make contact with representatives of exhibiting companies.

This year the Don Whitley Scientific exhibition area was purpose-built to accommodate the cutting edge technology on show. This included the Walkaway Specimen Processor (WASPLab), the Whitley A35 Anaerobic Workstation, and ChromaZona from Synbiosis, the new automated microbial identification AST analysis system. Members of the DWS sales force were on hand to deal with any customer queries.

The stand also featured an area where delegates could interact with our virtual lab, an interactive presentation where our product range could be explored in detail.

As is the custom with at IBMS, we also held a competition. This year we celebrated 40 years of serving the microbiology industry, with Love2Shop vouchers on offer for the lucky winners. Visitors to the stand needed to look for clues in a video presentation, which would give them the answers to a range of questions.  And each and every visitor to our stand had the opportunity to further indulge in a corporate cupcake.

 

 

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Whitley Hypoxystation

World Heart Day: Hypoxia in Cardiovascular Disease Research

Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, is responsible for approximately 1 in 3 deaths in the US, according to the American Heart Association. World Heart Day on 29 September serves as a platform to educate people on how to take control of their heart health.

Don Whitley Scientific and our US/Canadian distributor HypOxygen would like to take this opportunity to highlight cardiovascular research being carried out around the world – and to say “thank you for being committed to our health.”

Adverse cardiac remodeling after infarction exacerbates myocardial ischemia and increases the likelihood of heart failure. Revuelta-Lopez et al. in Spain present new data showing that in the hypoxic areas of the infarct zone, expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is linked to activation of Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) through Pyk2 phosphorylation, and propose that LRP1 modulation may be a very effective pharmacological target in heart disease. Their H35 Hypoxystation with its controlled low oxygen environment creates physiologically more relevant parameters for cell culture, mimicking ischemia/reperfusion events.

Hypothesizing that Tumor necrosis factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand plays a role in ischemic injury during acute myocardial infarction, Jiang et al. have found evidence for a novel immune regulatory mechanism involving TRAIL, ER stress and NF-κB signaling pathways. Culturing their cells in the Hypoxystation H35 at 0.3% oxygen allowed the lab to simulate the ischemia/reperfusion processes that cause cardiomyocyte loss and increase mortality in Coronary Heart Disease.

Hypoxia in the embryonic environment supports maintenance of a primitive glycosaminoglycan-rich heart valve matrix, the specific composition of which determines proper function, and as hypoxia decreases after birth, the extracellular matrix matures. Amofa et al. at Cincinnati’s Children’s Medical Center, using the H35 Hypoxystation, provide new data that exposure of adult heart tissue to hypoxia induces hyaluronan remodeling, GAG accumulation, and degeneration of the extracellular matrix in the heart valve, effects that are implicated in Myxomatous mitral valve disease.

Dr. Michael Cross, Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology Department, University of Liverpool, says of his work with cardiac spheroids : “The H35 allows us to generate oxygen levels that reflect the in vivo physiology these cells would be exposed to. We chose the Hypoxystation with its oxygen profiling feature, which allows us to recreate cycles of ischemia, where oxygen levels typically sink to 1-3%”.

Revuelta-Lopez et al 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image from: Revuelta-Lopez et al. “Relationship among LRP1 expression, Pyk2 phosphorylation and MMP-9 activation in left ventricular remodelling after myocardial infarction” J Cell Mol Med. 2017 Sep;21(9):1915-1928

 

Amofa et al 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hypoxia increases GAGs, Sox9 nuclear localization and Hyal2 expression in cAVOCs.

Image from: Amofa et al. (2017) “Hypoxia promotes primitive glycosaminoglycan-rich extracellular matrix composition in developing heart valves” Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2017 Aug 25:ajpheart.00209.2017

 

 

 

DWS Exhibit at IBMS 2017

The Don Whitley Scientific team are at IBMS this week, pictured here at our exhibition stand, demonstrating the A35 Anaerobic Workstation, WASP Flo for WASPLab™, and Chromazona. To learn more about these and our extensive range of other products, come along to stand 407 and talk to one of our Product Specialists.

You could also take part in our competition – we are celebrating 40 years in business and would like you to help us commemorate this milestone with a fun quiz and the chance to win £40 worth of Love2Shop vouchers.

 

 

Celebrating 40 Years Graphic

Celebrate with DWS and Win! – IBMS 2017

Visit the Don Whitley Scientific stand at this year’s IBMS Congress and enter our fun quiz to win £40 worth of shopping vouchers

If you are attending this year’s Biomedical Science Congress then come and take part in our competition – we’re celebrating being in business for 40 years. 40 years serving science is quite an achievement and we would like you to help us commemorate this corporate milestone with a fun quiz!

Ask at stand 407 for an entry form.

The entry form features 6 simple questions about Don Whitley Scientific’s history: from humble origins to the state-of-the-art products and services we offer today.

The first correct entry drawn each day (25th, 26th + 27th September) wins £40 worth of Love2Shop vouchers.

We will contact all winners by phone or email so you can come and collect your prize or arrange to have it delivered to you.

You will also receive a Don Whitley Scientific pen just for entering the quiz.

GOOD LUCK

Don Whitley Scientific will be exhibiting at IBMS next week from 24th – 27th September. Visit our stand to see what products we have on show and join us in our 40 year’s serving science celebration