DON WHITLEY SCIENTIFIC – THE LEADING INTERNATIONAL SUPPLIER TO THE MICROBIOLOGY AND TISSUE CULTURE INDUSTRIES


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Biomedical Scientist_Clinical Microbiology of Anaerobes Course

Campylobactor Research with Microaerobic Workstations

The following words were provided by Microbiology International 

Cultivation of microaerophilic organisms from environmental niches such as Campylobacter species and Helicobacter pylori requires precise calibration of oxygen levels and other growth parameters. Microbiology International, North American distributor for Don Whitley Scientific, have been installing anaerobic and microaerobic incubation chambers for more than 20 years, and would like to introduce some of the research being carried out around the world. Click here to view our Microaerobic Workstations.

The complex interactions of microbial communities populating the human gastrointestinal tract with their host and with invading pathogens are paramount to safeguarding not only a healthy gut but also our general health. Microaerophilic bacterial species, such as Campylobacter jejuni, can cause gastro-enteric infections due to their ability to survive and grow in lower oxygen environments, which they encounter in the human gastro-intestinal tract. At the Ottawa Institute of Systems Biology, Dr. Alain Stintzi researches topics as diverse as iron homeostasis and oxidative stress and the competitive advantage of metabolizing L-Fucose in Campylobacter jejuni. Using a Don Whitley Scientific microaerobic workstation, Dr. Stinzi states that “One objective of our research is to understand how enteric pathogens such as Campylobacter jejuni acquire essential nutrients, adapt to the harsh conditions of the intestine and interact with the host’s microbiota to cause disease.”

At Ohio State University, Dr. Jeffrey Lejeune’s research is focused on prevention of diseases caused by food-borne pathogens in plants and animals, including C. jejuniE. coli O157, and Clostridium difficile. His work on antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter and other enteric pathogens has prompted the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation to recruit him to provide technical support and guidance in an international group working on antibiotic resistance. Don Whitley Scientific anaerobic and microaerobic workstations , sold in the US by Microbiology International, provide precise gas control for a sustainable low oxygen environment. Up to four gasses can be combined to create the ideal atmosphere for fastidious microorganisms.

In the UK, Dr. Andrew Grant at the University of Cambridge is investigating the Campylobacter jejuni secretome and diarrhoeal disease in a gnotobiotic piglet model, using the MACS VA500 and more recently, the M95 Microaerobic Workstation. His work to elucidate host-pathogen interaction and virulence strategies will yield new options for therapy and vaccination. Don Whitley Scientific will be there for him, and our other researchers, every step of the way.

 

From: Stahl et al. (2011) “L-fucose utilization provides Campylobacter jejuni with a competitive advantage“ Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Apr 26;108(17):7194-9

From: Stahl et al. (2011) “L-fucose utilization provides Campylobacter jejuni with a competitive advantage“ Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Apr 26;108(17):7194-9

From: Tang et al. (2017) “Rising fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter isolated from feedlot cattle in the United States” Scientific Reports 7: 494

From: Tang et al. (2017) “Rising fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter isolated from feedlot cattle in the United States” Scientific Reports 7: 494

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clostridium difficile studies can be done in a Whitley Workstation

Hallmarks of Cancer: Sustaining Growth and Resisting Cell Death

In part four of our mini-series describing “Hypoxia and the Hallmarks of Cancer”, we look more closely at how researchers are using the Hypoxystation to delineate the Hallmarks Sustaining Growth and Resisting Cell Death.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resisting Cell Death

The ability of cells to resist cell death under hypoxic conditions is central to the progression of cancer and the acquisition of resistance to chemotherapy so frequently encountered in tumors. Hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment exerts selective pressure favoring cells that have lost the functionality of apoptosis genes and can expand uncontrollably.  Hypoxia also contributes to survival by inducing autophagy, in a pathway involving HIF-1, beclin, BNIP3 and BNIP3L, in which cellular autophagy acts to recycle cellular organelles, satisfy metabolic demand and improve hypoxic tolerance.  HIF-1 mediates cell-cycle retardation and arrest, causing hypoxic tumor cells to become resistant to radiotherapies. NF-κB, through its effects on myriad transcription factors, for example through inhibition of cell death signalling, is activated by hypoxia and reactive oxygen species, and also promotes cell survival.

Sustaining Growth

Cancer is essentially based on the cells’ inability to “stop” when suppressors signal an end to growth, and the compunction to “go” despite a lack of bonafide growth signals. Hypoxia in the context of cancer, in precipitating genomic instability and mutation, results in numerous inactive tumor suppressor genes and activated growth factor genes, such that the combination of constitutive proliferative signaling and mutated cancer genes leads to sustained growth. HIF and NF-κB regulated pathways involving Notch, mTOR, WNT11, CAIX, and IGF-1, among many others, contribute to sustained growth in cancer as regulation of proliferation derails. Induced by hypoxia-regulated proteins, anabolic pathways for nucleotide and lipid synthesis are ramped up and enable the rapid proliferation typical of cancer.

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Rest Assured That Your Anaerobic Workstation is at Zero Oxygen

The following was written by Microbiology International, Don Whitley Scientific’s supplier of the Anaerobic Workstation in the US

Don Whitley Scientific have turned the maintenance and monitoring of stringent anaerobes in their anaerobic workstations into an art. The unique combination of anaerobic conditions monitoring (ACM) and catalyst monitoring available on the  A35, A45, A55, A85 and A95 workstations guarantees that strict anaerobes really will be well within their comfort zone. Microbiology International is the North American distributor for these anaerobic workstations.

The ACM comprises of an oxygen sensor placed inside the workstation and software to process real-time data on oxygen levels in the chamber. Based on knowledge of bacterial oxygen tolerance, results are shown on the touchscreen interface as a colour-coded indicator of O2 concentration. Green, yellow, or red status bars clearly indicate to the user whether oxygen levels are acceptable and provide information on the correct functioning of the workstation. This fully automated system replaces resazurin strips, which can dry out and are subject to interpretation based on the pink-to-white colour change.

The palladium catalyst used to remove traces of oxygen in the Don Whitley Scientific anaerobic workstations is protected through the addition of Anotox, which removes volatile organic compounds and hydrogen sulfide from the chamber atmosphere. Proper functioning of this vital system is monitored by the patented Catalyst Monitoring System, which tests the function of the catalyst overnight, and also confirms that the necessary hydrogen is present.

Together, the anaerobic conditions and catalyst monitoring systems provide unambiguous proof that anaerobiosis is being maintained in the workstations. The art of “zero oxygen” is critically important to cultivating anaerobic microorganisms that, due to their fastidious nature, are often classified as “unculturable“. Taking advantage of the closed workstation format to establish a strictly controlled anaerobic atmosphere, researchers are using Whitley Workstations to examine diverse topics such as the degradation of complex glycans by human gut microbiota;  the rise in C. difficile infections through lawn contamination; and the anaerobic etiology of brain abscesses.

The A35 Anaerobic Workstation will be on the Don Whitley Scientific stand at this years IBMS Congress in Birmingham


 

 

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Hypoxia and the Hallmarks of Cancer: Angiogenesis and Metastasis

The following was provided by HypOxygen, our distributor of Hypoxic Workstations in the US

Hanahan and Weinberg’s “Hallmarks of Cancer” are at the root of the multi-step progression of cancer, and they are all influenced by hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment. In this mini-review series, HypOxygen has been taking a closer look at the way Hypoxystation users worldwide are delineating the effects of hypoxia on the Hallmarks of Cancer: so far, we’ve showcased Avoiding Immune Destruction and Tumor Promoting Inflammation and Genome Instability and Mutation and Enabling Replicative Immortality.

In the Hypoxystation, researchers working with cells in culture can mimic the physiological conditions that produce those characteristic Hallmarks. The Hypoxystation enables glove-less access to cultivate and manipulate cells under physiological conditions, in a HEPA-clean environment. Oxygen levels in the Hypoxystation can be reliably and accurately adjusted to below 1%, reflecting the high metabolism, low perfusion tumor microenvironment.

 

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1. Inducing Angiogenesis

Angiogenesis and tumor-associated neo-vascularization are central to the progression of cancer, and hypoxia in the fast-growing, poorly perfused tumor setting is one of the main factors driving the formation of new vessels. Hypoxia in the tumor activates the hypoxia stress response, which is mediated at the cellular level by HIF, VEGF and many other cytokines, growth factors and guidance molecules. As a consequence, endothelial cells and pericytes proliferate and form new blood vessels, which are, however, disorderly and leaky, in turn exacerbating hypoxia in the tumor. Cancer treatment strategies striving to normalize tumor vessels for the purpose of improved drug delivery and alleviation of hypoxia in the tumor are showing great promise.

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2. Activating Invasion and Metastasis

As with the other Hallmarks of Cancer, metastasis and cancer progression are correlated with low oxygen levels in the tumor. HIF’s activate the expression of more than 1000 genes, numerous of which play a role in inducing genes involved in the EMT, through direct interactions with HRE’s at promotor sites and other mechanisms such as epigenetic alterations, like methylation/demethylation. Hypoxia promotes migration and invasion by facilitating the endothelial-mesenchymal transition, altering cell-cell contacts, and reducing adhesion to the extra-cellular matrix. Cancer cells and neighboring cells such as fibroblasts are all influenced by hypoxia, and all contribute to the restructuring of the tumor microenvironment. The effects of the Hallmarks of Cancer continually perturb and promote each other, as when hypoxia-driven metabolic reprogramming causes acidification of the extracellular microenvironment through increased production and secretion of lactate, in turn augmenting ECM remodeling and immune evasion. Similarly, formation of novel blood vessels enables extravasation and migration of cancer cells to form new tumors.

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A Manic Month Continues for DWS

June continues to be busy for Don Whitley Scientific, with 6 exhibitions and events attended already. And we have two more to go!

In the month of June, we have attended several meetings and exhibitions that featured topics ranging from pathology, cancer research, LIMS systems and more. We helped to administer the 2017 Practical and Clinical Microbiology of Anaerobes Course, hosted by the UK Anaerobe Reference Unit, Cardiff. It was once again a fantastic success.

Next week (26th-28th June) DWS will be attending the Association for Radiation Research Annual Meeting, which this year focuses on the topic “Improving Radiotherapy Response through Radiation Research” featuring speakers from cancer research institutes from around the world. Don Whitley Scientific will have an exhibition stand at this meeting displaying the Whitley H45 Workstation. There will also be an interactive touchscreen presentation, which allows users to explore the full range of Whitley Workstations.

On 4th July we will also have an exhibition stand at the Society for Applied Microbiology Annual Applied Microbiology Conference at the BALTIC Centre in Gateshead. This meeting will focus on new insights into food safety. Here we will exhibit the ProtoCOL and WASP Touch, two products that provide real benefits in food microbiology applications.

 

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Busy June for Don Whitley Scientific

Don Whitley Scientific have a busy month in June with several exhibitions and events around the UK. Here’s a rundown on where you might see us and the equipment that we’ll be showing at these events.

Rapid Micro Methods – Campden BRI – 8th June – More info
The first meeting in June that Don Whitley Scientific will attend is the Rapid Micro Methods meeting at Campden BRI. This meeting features talks that cover rapid methods, automation and miniaturisation in microbiology. Don Whitley Scientific will be exhibiting a WASP Touch, ProtoCOL3 Plus and Masterclave 20.

 

Welsh Microbiology Association Summer Meeting – Village Hotel, Swansea – 9th June – More info
This one day event gathers some of the most important figures working in Welsh microbiology. Don Whitley Scientific will be exhibiting a WASP Touch and ProtoCOL3 at the event.

BACR Tumour Microenvironment – Nottingham Conference Centre – 14th-16th June – More info
This meeting aims to highlight the latest advances in this field from basic science to clinical development and to provide a workshop forum for researchers to discuss recent developments in 3D cancer modelling. Don Whitley Scientific will be exhibiting a Whitley H35 Hypoxystation at this meeting, a market leading workstation for working with cancer cells in a physiologically relevant atmosphere.

Clinisys Summer Conference – The Belfry, Birmingham – 14th-16th June –  More info
The CliniSys Summer  Conference and user group meeting will once again be hosted at The Belfry on the 15th & 16th June. More than 250 delegates are expected to attend to hear thought-provoking presentations and discussions with some of the key innovators and thought leaders in healthcare and laboratory medicine. Don Whitley Scientific will be exhibiting a Chromazona on their stand, as well as an interactive display featuring all Don Whitley Scientific Workstations

Association for Radiation Research 2017 – St Hilda’s College, Oxford – 27th-28th June – More info
This year’s ARR meeting will be focusing on “Improving radiotherapy response through radiation research”.  The meeting programme features talks from academics from around the world, speaking on subjects relevant to radiotherapy and radiation. Don Whitley Scientific will have a Whitley H35 Hypoxystation on show at this event.

WASP Touch Spiral Plater

New WASP Touch Spiral Plater Video

Don Whitley Scientific is pleased to announce a new video featuring WASP Touch, the spiral plater designed for the needs of modern microbiology laboratories. The video outlines the way in which spiral plating brings several cost and time savings to the laboratory, as well as discussing the options and accessories that are available to help tailor the system to your particular application.

If you haven’t already seen WASP Touch, here’s some background information on the product. If you need any further information, please see our website or contact us at sales@dwscientific.co.uk.

Read more

Clostridium difficile studies can be done in a Whitley Workstation

New Whitley Workstation Videos

 

Not convinced you need an anaerobic workstation?

Still juggling jars to grow your anaerobes?

Need the perfect atmosphere for your microaerophiles?

 

These new videos from Don Whitley Scientific will make you think again and realise that you can do so much more with a workstation:

An Introduction to Whitley Anaerobic Workstations

An Introduction to Whitley Microaerobic Workstations

As well as introducing the range of workstations available, the videos give an insight into the options and accessories that can tailor your anaerobic or microaerobic cabinet to your particular application or study.

You may work in a busy clinical or contract laboratory with a high throughput of samples to process. You could be a researcher performing a range of experiments, restricted by the limitations of the equipment available to you. Whatever your discipline, let us show you how you can benefit from a Whitley Workstation.

For further information, please contact our UK sales team on 01274 595728. For visitors from other countries, please contact your local distributor from the list on our website.

 

Samantha Fryer being presented with her award

Leeds University Poster Prizes 2017

Frank Charlton - 2nd Prize - Lab based projects

Frank Charlton – 2nd Prize – Lab based projects

Andrew Pridmore, Head of Microbiology, visited the University of Leeds Faculty of Biological Sciences on 4th May 2017 to present prizes to undergraduate students on the Microbiology, Medical Microbiology and Microbiology in relation to Medicine BSc degree courses.

These prizes, sponsored by Don Whitley Scientific, are awarded each year for poster presentations of the students’ final year research projects.  These are divided into two categories – laboratory research and literature review.  The winners this year were:

Laboratory-based projects:

1st   –    Samantha Fryer: “Lifestyle Choices of Dietary Supplement Users” (Samantha is pictured top left with Dr Pridmore)

2nd  –    Frank Charlton: “A Pharmacological Approach to Identifying BUNV Entry Mechanisms”

3rd   –    Danielle Beeson: “Mutant calreticulin requires Tyr-626 of the thrombopoietin receptor for oncogenic transformation”

Literature reviews:

Prize winner Katherine Kelleher with Dr Andrew Pridmore

Prize winner Katherine Kelleher with Dr Andrew Pridmore

1st   –    Katherine Kelleher: “How to create a successful oncolytic agent”

2nd  –    Kurt Rushworth: “Brain Metastases: Mechanisms and Therapeutics”

3rd   –    Hope Denyer: “Old Drugs, New Wheels: reinvigorating natural products against cancer”

All posters were of a very high standard, but Andrew was especially pleased to find several research projects on the subject of antibiotic susceptibility / resistance and some interesting concepts for novel antibacterial therapies.  A selection of these is provided below:

  • Adhiron and the antibiotic resistance crisis: a change in direction (Edward Davies)
  • Can understanding bacterial immune evasion strategies help to generate novel antivirulence therapeutics? (Rebecca Golenya)
  • Immune evasion strategies employed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa as potential drug targets (Marie Horsler)
  • BAM: A solution to the antibiotic resistance crisis in Gram-negative bacteria? (Charles Kelleher)
  • The emerging role of anti-virulence therapies within antimicrobial resistance (Scarlet-Daisy Prior)

We wish the very best of luck to all of the final year students who are now immersed in their examinations!

To download copies of any of the above papers, please go to this page on our website.

 

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Why Choose a Whitley Workstation?

There are many reasons to choose a Whitley Workstation when it comes to Anaerobic, Hypoxic or Microaerophilic work. We can discuss these with you anytime, but we also have plenty of satisfied customers who have expressed why using a Whitley Workstation improves their working methods and results.

Over the years, customers have supplied us with many testimonials about their Don Whitley Scientific products. From these we can see that not only have Whitley Workstations become approved by fantastic researchers worldwide, but we can also help promote the amazing work that is done by our customers.

Dr Vaibhao Janbandhu at the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute (VCCR) in Sydney, Australia uses a Whitley H35 Hypoxystation in his work on finding new ways to stimulate heart regeneration during ageing and after heart attack. He uses his H35 Hypoxystation to isolate, culture and characterise adult cardiac stem cells. In Dr Janbandhu’s words the H35 is “an integral part of the project to advance the project aims”.

In this video testimonial, Jane Freeman at Leeds General Infirmary explains how her Whitley A95 Workstation improves the working methods in her Clostridium difficile research. Jane reports that she and her team are able to use the workstation for “several hours at a time in relative comfort” and that the workstation is able to house all the technical equipment her team requires. This allows “the whole experiment to be performed in optimum conditions without introducing air at all”. Jane explains that “reliability, versatility and space are the significant benefits of the workstations in our work on Clostridium difficile“.

The Institute of Cancer Research in London is one of the world’s most influential research institutes, with an outstanding record of achievement dating back more than 100 years. At the Institute, George Poulogiannis uses a combination of Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation (with Seahorse XF Analyzer) and Whitley H35 Hypoxystation in his research into breast cancer. Hypoxia is a key factor in the “Hallmarks of Cancer” and this team are studying the role of hypoxia in cell invasion and metastasis, oncogene-induced senescence and resistance to current treatment options. The i2 and H35 replicate a physiologically relevant atmosphere for these studies, enabling consistent and reliable results. This combination of Workstations is also used by Dr Ayse Latif, who is researching gynaecological cancers at The University of Manchester.

Don Whitley Scientific would like to take this opportunity to thank all customers who have provided testimonials. If you would be interested in supplying a testimonial, please contact Alex_Rhodes@dwscientific.co.uk.

Take a look at our other testimonials