DON WHITLEY SCIENTIFIC – THE LEADING INTERNATIONAL SUPPLIER TO THE MICROBIOLOGY AND TISSUE CULTURE INDUSTRIES


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Picture of Helen Inns in The Mould That Changed the World

The Mould That Changed the World

Don Whitley Scientific has some very talented customers, not least Leeds Biomedical Scientist, Helen Inns. Helen is usually to be found at the WASPLab, working with bacteria including MRSA and Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae. This month, instead of just looking for “Superbugs”, she’s making a song and dance about them – at the Edinburgh Fringe.

Helen is part of a chorus of healthcare professionals performing in the world premiere of a brand-new musical, called The Mould That Changed the World. The show is a fun educational production which tells the story of Fleming’s discovery of penicillin, the development of antibiotics, and the looming crisis of antimicrobial resistance which now threatens healthcare as we know it.

Banner ad for The Mould that Changed the World

The Mould That Changed the World is receiving rave reviews at the Edinburgh Fringe, where it’s showing daily until 25th August.

After that, a free resource pack will be available, so primary schools can put on their own production and empower children to learn about and spread the message of antimicrobial stewardship.

Follow on Facebook and Twitter:  https://www.facebook.com/mouldchangedtheworld/

https://twitter.com/ThatMould

Find out more, or sign up for the schools production, at www.mouldthatchangedtheworld.com

 

 

Whitley A95 Workstation for Jin Sung on final test

End of an Era for Don Whitley Scientific

Production comes to a close in Shipley

The last Whitley Workstation to be manufactured by Don Whitley Scientific in Shipley has now rolled off the production line. This particular order was an A95 Anaerobic Workstation ordered by Jin Sung Unitech, Republic of Korea.

JS Unitech LogoAccording to Junghoon Hong of Jin Sung, “We had no idea that in placing this order, we would be commissioning the last ever workstation to be built at Don Whitley Scientific in Shipley. We have been distributing Whitley Workstations for 19 years and are very proud to have ordered the last one from the Shipley production line.”

Paul Walton added, “I am extremely happy that we are moving to bigger and better premises that will provide the opportunity to improve our production processes. Victoria Works will provide considerably more warehousing capacity plus new offices, a bespoke production area, service centre, R&D mezzanine and improved staff facilities including a large, fully fitted, air-conditioned canteen. There will also be a new product showroom where customers can view demonstrations of the latest anaerobic and hypoxic workstation technology.

“An element of nostalgia is, however, creeping in as we draw close to the move date. We have been manufacturing in  Shipley for over 40 years and I have seen many changes in those four decades. We will, however, focus on the positives and move the business forward to face the challenges of the next 40 years!”

When Don Whitley Scientific began making workstations, it was purely for the UK market. We now have over 4,000 workstations in over 50 countries.

It might be the end of one era but another, exciting one begins at our new premises in Bingley.

Clostridium difficile studies can be done in a Whitley Workstation

An exciting opportunity to join our sales team

Anyone interested in an exciting opportunity to move into sales?

Don Whitley Scientific now has a vacancy for a Technical Sales Representative.

The Role

As a Technical Sales Representative you will promote an exciting range of laboratory equipment and service contracts. Brands include Whitley Anaerobic, Hypoxic and Microaerobic Workstations, Whitley Automated Spiral Plater plus products such as the automated specimen processor WASPLab, media/sample preparation equipment and other niche laboratory equipment.

This role will provide an opportunity for the successful candidate to further develop an established customer base and build a long-term, lucrative career in the UK as well as the possibility of overseas travel.

Candidates with no previous sales experience will be considered as training will be provided. A high level of support will also be available from senior colleagues.

 

Core responsibilities include:

  • Maximising sales potential and business growth by establishing relationships and collaborations with customers.
  • Working closely with marketing to ensure relevant promotions are delivered to customers and that feedback from customers is relayed back to inform future planning.

Essential Requirements:

  • Highly motivated and ambitious.
  • Hands-on approach and comfortable with daily travel.
  • Articulate, confident communicator able to engage with people at all levels, including technical managers and procurement/finance personnel.
  • Independent and decisive, using creative thought and sound logic to identify, prioritise and maximise opportunities.
  • Based in the north of England to serve a territory that extends into Scotland.

Our sales team comprises of successful people with and without a science background, so experience in a scientific discipline is not a prerequisite.

 

Remuneration

Package includes:

  • Basic salary dependent upon experience
  • Attractive bonus scheme
  • Company car

How to apply

Please email Steve Robertson, Sales Director on steve_robertson@dwscientific.co.uk attaching a current CV.

STRICTLY NO AGENCIES

removal van

Don Whitley Scientific to Move to Bingley

After 40 years of manufacturing in Shipley, Don Whitley Scientific Limited has announced that the company will move to new premises in Bingley.

 

 

 

 

Managing director, Paul Walton, explains:Paul Walton
“Our business has expanded considerably, particularly over the last 10 years, and despite having purchased numbers 16 and 18 Otley Road, we have still outgrown our current facilities. When Victoria Works came up for sale, providing 48,100 sq ft, we knew this would be the right move for us. The Bingley premises will provide us with the space to organise ourselves more efficiently and still have room to expand.”

 

 

 

The new premises, just off Bradford Road, is undergoing a major refit (by Eclipse Interiors) to make it suitable for the company’s needs. There will be considerably more warehousing capacity plus new offices, a bespoke production area, service centre, R&D mezzanine and improved staff facilities including a large, fully fitted, air-conditioned canteen. There will also be a new product showroom where customers can view demonstrations of the latest anaerobic and hypoxic workstation technology.

 

 

The office for sales, service and marketing

The office for sales, service and marketing

Warehouse area

Warehouse area

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product showroom

Product showroom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The move will take place from 13 to 17 June so the business will be operational from Bingley on Monday, 18 June.

 

Professor Tom Riley Lab

30 Year Commitment for Professor Tom Riley

Professor Tom Riley from Pathwest Laboratory Medicine and The University of Western Australia has been a committed Don Whitley Scientific customer for over 30 years. In the past few years he has installed two A35 Anaerobic Workstations into his lab to replace a Whitley MK III Workstation that had given him over 20 years of reliable performance.

Professor Riley started using anaerobic workstations over 30 years ago when the capacity and time consuming operation of jar gassing systems was deemed unsuitable for the number of samples he had. Tom explained to Don Whitley Scientific how he came to use Whitley Workstations. “My original anaerobic chamber from a manufacturer in Australia (that doesn’t exist anymore) was hopeless.”. The next option for Professor Riley was a Whitley MKIII Anaerobic Workstation, which served his lab for over 20 years, and was the first Whitley Anaerobic Workstation in Australia. His two Whitley A35 Anaerobic Workstations currently play a part in work that Professor Riley explains as “almost exclusively research into Clostridium difficile. This includes everything from diagnostics to pathogenesis and epidemiology”.

Although the MK III provided a reliable anaerobic environment for such a long time in Professor Riley’s lab, there are new benefits provided by the A35 Anaerobic Workstation that Tom finds particularly useful, such as the Instant Access Porthole System and Letterbox entry. The Instant Access Porthole System is unique to DWS, allowing entry to the chamber in seconds without the need of gloves or sleeves. Letterbox entry allows the user to introduce Petri dishes and similar small items into the anaerobic workstation environment in no time at all. As aforementioned, Tom also needed extra capacity to process a large number of samples. Compared to using the MKIII or anaerobic jars, the main chamber of an A35 Anaerobic Workstation will accommodate between 400-600 x 90mm Petri dishes depending on whether plate carriers are used, which accessories and system options have been incorporated and how much working space is required.

The space and reliability provided by Whitley Workstations has served Professor Tom Riley well for over three decades now. He is part of a long list of satisfied Whitley Workstation users around the world, who are all doing fantastic work with Don Whitley Scientific products.


 

Recent papers from the Riley lab are listed below

 

 

WASP Touch

WASP Touch and ProtoCOL3 play key part in Australian Lab

A research and development lab at the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries (Sydney, Australia) recently purchased a WASP Touch Spiral Plater and ProtoCOL3 colony counter. The lab is carrying out research on food safety of fresh horticultural produce and nuts. The head of the research program, Dr SP Singh, spoke to Don Whitley Scientific to explain how these two new products, provided by DWS, are key to his team’s working processes.

Dr Singh and his colleagues are exploring fresh options when it comes to food safety: “We are developing new ways of sanitising the produce by killing potential foodborne bacterial pathogens”. The produce his lab are sanitising is often used for export, meaning this is a vital process to ensure safety for the consumer. Dr Singh explains that “we have to deal with hundreds of samples everyday” meaning “plating and enumeration is a core lab activity”.

The lab’s project was recently featured on NBN News – http://www.nbnnews.com.au/2017/11/10/world-first-food-sanitiser-at-ourimbah/. The project is a world’s first and to sanitise food without the use of chemicals could be a revolutionary step forward in food safety.

Speaking about his decision to invest in the DWS products, Dr Singh said “we were looking to improve lab productivity and resource use efficiency by switching to spiral plating and automatic counting”.

The Whitley WASP Touch is the latest spiral plater from Don Whitley Scientific (who have been manufacturing spiral platers since their inception in the 1970s). WASP Touch provides real cost savings and process improvements, as well as eliminating the time-consuming process of serial dilution.

The ProtoCOL3 (from Synbiosis) facilitates automated colony counting and zone reading using a hi-specification digital camera and LED lighting. The system comes equipped with a touchscreen PC for analysing samples. Another positive that we provided to Dr Singh was the fact Don Whitley Scientific was able to provide both of these products, making the acquisition of vital equipment more straight forward: “Don Whitley Scientific offered this integrated solution of automatic plating and counting”.

To summarise, the WASP Touch and ProtoCOL3 should provide improvements to the efficiency and working methods of Dr SP Singh’s revolutionary lab.

 

Dr S.P. Singh's Lab

Dr SP Singh’s Lab

 

 

The WASP Touch and ProtoCOL3 should provide improvements to the efficiency and working methods of DR SP Singh’s revolutionary lab. To find out more about the Don Whitley Scientific product range in the UK click here, call us on +44 (0) 1274 595728 or email us at  sales@dwscientific.co.uk

For Don Whitley Scientific Australia click here call us on (02) 4339 1029 or email us at  sales@dwscientific.com.au

 

 

 

 

WASP Touch in operation

How to Choose a Spiral Plater for Your Microbiology Laboratory

In this exclusive interview with rapidmicrobiology.com, Dr. Andrew Pridmore, Head of Microbiology at Don Whitley Scientific, discusses the benefits of using a spiral plater, what to look for in a system and how the new WASP Touch from Don Whitley Scientific (DWS) can help ensure your laboratory has consistent trackable, plating results.

Don Whitley Scientific introduced their first Spiral plater in 1978, why are they still relevant to today’s modern microbiology lab?
Much of the testing done back in 1978 when we first introduced spiral plating to the UK, is still relevant today. However, increased quality control measures have led to laboratories looking more to automation to help improve reproducibility and accuracy. Spiral plating offers a real reduction in the cost-per-test and standardises counting methods. Serial dilutions, for many users, can be eliminated, which in turn saves time, the cost of consumables and space in the incubator.

 

One of the key issues facing labs is calibration, validation and traceability, how can a spiral plater help with this?
Spiral plating techniques are recognised in the ISO 4833-2 standard. This is a general recognition of the use of spiral plating techniques in food microbiology and provides standardised procedures for their use.

Many spiral plating processes cannot be calibrated but with the WASP Touch, users can calibrate the delivery of the sample. There is also the option to include a bar code scanner. Traceability is facilitated with the inclusion of the Data Handling package for WASP Touch. This option records date, time, user, plate id, volume, date and at which volumes, date of the last start and finish position check, and date the last dye plate was performed. It also provides multi-level PIN-code protection. Data can be downloaded via USB in a format that can be loaded directly into Excel. An Ethernet connection for data transfer/service support is also included.

When choosing a new spiral plater what features should a buyer be looking for?
An automated spiral plater is ideal for those who regularly need to plate samples with a microbial content greater than 1,000 CFU/ml. Buyers should look for a plater that is flexible enough to process their particular samples, in terms of quantity and type of sample. For example, WASP Touch offers an Extended Volume Package to enable a wider range of volumes on a plate. Buyers should also consider the level of after-sales service, maintenance and support offered by the manufacturer. If you are opting for an automated method to speed up your processes, the last thing you want is for there to be a problem that causes an unacceptable level of downtime.

 

 

 

If a lab is getting an in-house demo for a spiral plater do you have any recommendations for how to test it?
At Don Whitley, we feel that any test should be as realistic as possible so would always look to perform a demo or trial with the actual samples the laboratory uses. After working through a demonstration with the customer, we would ideally arrange for them to have a spiral plater for an extended trial. This helps them to make a more informed purchase decision.

DWS have recently introduced a next generation spiral plater, what issues does this model address?
The new WASP Touch spiral plater simply modernises the process of spiral plating. The user interface is now a touchscreen with easy-to-use icons. Other features such as FlowSense ensure that the sample is correctly processed, alerting the user to any issues in time for corrections to be made; and AIMS, the intuitive software that guides users through the set-up routine.

If a lab wanted to introduce the new DWS spiral plater, what validation steps would be needed (is that the same if they were introducing spiral plating for the first time or upgrading to the new DWS system)?
WASP Touch, and spiral platers in general, require minimal validation because spiral plating methodology has already been validated and published in the international standard ISO 4833-2:2013.  The ISO standard includes methods for calibration and validation of the sample volumes deposited onto an agar plate by a spiral plater.

 


To find out more about WASP Touch or other DWS products, please call +44 (0) 1274 595728 or email at sales@dwscientific.co.uk


Scientist Working in Whitley Workstation

Practical & Clinical Microbiology of Anaerobes Course 2018

A 2 day residential course delivered by The UK Anaerobe Reference Unit, Public Health Wales, Cardiff

14-15 June 2018

Is it time to refresh your knowledge on the culturing, identification and clinical importance of anaerobes?

Are your staff wanting to learn from experts about the latest technologies and techniques?

• Recognised by the IBMS & RCPath CPD approved (11 credits)
• Invaluable preparation for FRCPath

Only 26 places available.

Cost: £375 + VAT (£355 + VAT for SAM members) which includes: one night accommodation at the Park Plaza Hotel, Cardiff, all meals and refreshments plus dinner on 14th June.


For more information please visit the Don Whitley Scientific website
www.dwscientific.co.uk/practicalmicrobiologycourse/

To reserve your place on this course, please contact:
Deborah Robinson at Don Whitley Scientific Limited on 01274 595728/sales@dwscientific.co.uk
Places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

 

PaCMan Course 2017

 

 

 

Biomedical Scientist_Clinical Microbiology of Anaerobes Course

Campylobactor Research with Microaerobic Workstations

The following words were provided by Microbiology International 

Cultivation of microaerophilic organisms from environmental niches such as Campylobacter species and Helicobacter pylori requires precise calibration of oxygen levels and other growth parameters. Microbiology International, North American distributor for Don Whitley Scientific, have been installing anaerobic and microaerobic incubation chambers for more than 20 years, and would like to introduce some of the research being carried out around the world. Click here to view our Microaerobic Workstations.

The complex interactions of microbial communities populating the human gastrointestinal tract with their host and with invading pathogens are paramount to safeguarding not only a healthy gut but also our general health. Microaerophilic bacterial species, such as Campylobacter jejuni, can cause gastro-enteric infections due to their ability to survive and grow in lower oxygen environments, which they encounter in the human gastro-intestinal tract. At the Ottawa Institute of Systems Biology, Dr. Alain Stintzi researches topics as diverse as iron homeostasis and oxidative stress and the competitive advantage of metabolizing L-Fucose in Campylobacter jejuni. Using a Don Whitley Scientific microaerobic workstation, Dr. Stinzi states that “One objective of our research is to understand how enteric pathogens such as Campylobacter jejuni acquire essential nutrients, adapt to the harsh conditions of the intestine and interact with the host’s microbiota to cause disease.”

At Ohio State University, Dr. Jeffrey Lejeune’s research is focused on prevention of diseases caused by food-borne pathogens in plants and animals, including C. jejuniE. coli O157, and Clostridium difficile. His work on antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter and other enteric pathogens has prompted the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation to recruit him to provide technical support and guidance in an international group working on antibiotic resistance. Don Whitley Scientific anaerobic and microaerobic workstations , sold in the US by Microbiology International, provide precise gas control for a sustainable low oxygen environment. Up to four gasses can be combined to create the ideal atmosphere for fastidious microorganisms.

In the UK, Dr. Andrew Grant at the University of Cambridge is investigating the Campylobacter jejuni secretome and diarrhoeal disease in a gnotobiotic piglet model, using the MACS VA500 and more recently, the M95 Microaerobic Workstation. His work to elucidate host-pathogen interaction and virulence strategies will yield new options for therapy and vaccination. Don Whitley Scientific will be there for him, and our other researchers, every step of the way.

 

From: Stahl et al. (2011) “L-fucose utilization provides Campylobacter jejuni with a competitive advantage“ Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Apr 26;108(17):7194-9

From: Stahl et al. (2011) “L-fucose utilization provides Campylobacter jejuni with a competitive advantage“ Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Apr 26;108(17):7194-9

From: Tang et al. (2017) “Rising fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter isolated from feedlot cattle in the United States” Scientific Reports 7: 494

From: Tang et al. (2017) “Rising fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter isolated from feedlot cattle in the United States” Scientific Reports 7: 494

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clostridium difficile studies can be done in a Whitley Workstation

Hallmarks of Cancer: Sustaining Growth and Resisting Cell Death

In part four of our mini-series describing “Hypoxia and the Hallmarks of Cancer”, we look more closely at how researchers are using the Hypoxystation to delineate the Hallmarks Sustaining Growth and Resisting Cell Death.

 

 

 

 

 

Hallmarks of Cancer

Resisting Cell Death

The ability of cells to resist cell death under hypoxic conditions is central to the progression of cancer and the acquisition of resistance to chemotherapy so frequently encountered in tumors. Hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment exerts selective pressure favoring cells that have lost the functionality of apoptosis genes and can expand uncontrollably.  Hypoxia also contributes to survival by inducing autophagy, in a pathway involving HIF-1, beclin, BNIP3 and BNIP3L, in which cellular autophagy acts to recycle cellular organelles, satisfy metabolic demand and improve hypoxic tolerance.  HIF-1 mediates cell-cycle retardation and arrest, causing hypoxic tumor cells to become resistant to radiotherapies. NF-κB, through its effects on myriad transcription factors, for example through inhibition of cell death signalling, is activated by hypoxia and reactive oxygen species, and also promotes cell survival.

Sustaining Growth

Cancer is essentially based on the cells’ inability to “stop” when suppressors signal an end to growth, and the compunction to “go” despite a lack of bonafide growth signals. Hypoxia in the context of cancer, in precipitating genomic instability and mutation, results in numerous inactive tumor suppressor genes and activated growth factor genes, such that the combination of constitutive proliferative signaling and mutated cancer genes leads to sustained growth. HIF and NF-κB regulated pathways involving Notch, mTOR, WNT11, CAIX, and IGF-1, among many others, contribute to sustained growth in cancer as regulation of proliferation derails. Induced by hypoxia-regulated proteins, anabolic pathways for nucleotide and lipid synthesis are ramped up and enable the rapid proliferation typical of cancer.

SustainingGrowthSliceLITERATURE: