DON WHITLEY SCIENTIFIC – THE LEADING INTERNATIONAL SUPPLIER TO THE MICROBIOLOGY AND TISSUE CULTURE INDUSTRIES


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WASP Touch Spiral Plater

New WASP Touch Spiral Plater Video

Don Whitley Scientific is pleased to announce a new video featuring WASP Touch, the spiral plater designed for the needs of modern microbiology laboratories. The video outlines the way in which spiral plating brings several cost and time savings to the laboratory, as well as discussing the options and accessories that are available to help tailor the system to your particular application.

If you haven’t already seen WASP Touch, here’s some background information on the product. If you need any further information, please see our website or contact us at sales@dwscientific.co.uk.

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Clostridium difficile studies can be done in a Whitley Workstation

New Whitley Workstation Videos

 

Not convinced you need an anaerobic workstation?

Still juggling jars to grow your anaerobes?

Need the perfect atmosphere for your microaerophiles?

 

These new videos from Don Whitley Scientific will make you think again and realise that you can do so much more with a workstation:

An Introduction to Whitley Anaerobic Workstations

An Introduction to Whitley Microaerobic Workstations

As well as introducing the range of workstations available, the videos give an insight into the options and accessories that can tailor your anaerobic or microaerobic cabinet to your particular application or study.

You may work in a busy clinical or contract laboratory with a high throughput of samples to process. You could be a researcher performing a range of experiments, restricted by the limitations of the equipment available to you. Whatever your discipline, let us show you how you can benefit from a Whitley Workstation.

For further information, please contact our UK sales team on 01274 595728. For visitors from other countries, please contact your local distributor from the list on our website.

 

Samantha Fryer being presented with her award

Leeds University Poster Prizes 2017

Frank Charlton - 2nd Prize - Lab based projects

Frank Charlton – 2nd Prize – Lab based projects

Andrew Pridmore, Head of Microbiology, visited the University of Leeds Faculty of Biological Sciences on 4th May 2017 to present prizes to undergraduate students on the Microbiology, Medical Microbiology and Microbiology in relation to Medicine BSc degree courses.

These prizes, sponsored by Don Whitley Scientific, are awarded each year for poster presentations of the students’ final year research projects.  These are divided into two categories – laboratory research and literature review.  The winners this year were:

Laboratory-based projects:

1st   –    Samantha Fryer: “Lifestyle Choices of Dietary Supplement Users” (Samantha is pictured top left with Dr Pridmore)

2nd  –    Frank Charlton: “A Pharmacological Approach to Identifying BUNV Entry Mechanisms”

3rd   –    Danielle Beeson: “Mutant calreticulin requires Tyr-626 of the thrombopoietin receptor for oncogenic transformation”

Literature reviews:

Prize winner Katherine Kelleher with Dr Andrew Pridmore

Prize winner Katherine Kelleher with Dr Andrew Pridmore

1st   –    Katherine Kelleher: “How to create a successful oncolytic agent”

2nd  –    Kurt Rushworth: “Brain Metastases: Mechanisms and Therapeutics”

3rd   –    Hope Denyer: “Old Drugs, New Wheels: reinvigorating natural products against cancer”

All posters were of a very high standard, but Andrew was especially pleased to find several research projects on the subject of antibiotic susceptibility / resistance and some interesting concepts for novel antibacterial therapies.  A selection of these is provided below:

  • Adhiron and the antibiotic resistance crisis: a change in direction (Edward Davies)
  • Can understanding bacterial immune evasion strategies help to generate novel antivirulence therapeutics? (Rebecca Golenya)
  • Immune evasion strategies employed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa as potential drug targets (Marie Horsler)
  • BAM: A solution to the antibiotic resistance crisis in Gram-negative bacteria? (Charles Kelleher)
  • The emerging role of anti-virulence therapies within antimicrobial resistance (Scarlet-Daisy Prior)

We wish the very best of luck to all of the final year students who are now immersed in their examinations!

To download copies of any of the above papers, please go to this page on our website.

 

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Why Choose a Whitley Workstation?

There are many reasons to choose a Whitley Workstation when it comes to Anaerobic, Hypoxic or Microaerophilic work. We can discuss these with you anytime, but we also have plenty of satisfied customers who have expressed why using a Whitley Workstation improves their working methods and results.

Over the years, customers have supplied us with many testimonials about their Don Whitley Scientific products. From these we can see that not only have Whitley Workstations become approved by fantastic researchers worldwide, but we can also help promote the amazing work that is done by our customers.

Dr Vaibhao Janbandhu at the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute (VCCR) in Sydney, Australia uses a Whitley H35 Hypoxystation in his work on finding new ways to stimulate heart regeneration during ageing and after heart attack. He uses his H35 Hypoxystation to isolate, culture and characterise adult cardiac stem cells. In Dr Janbandhu’s words the H35 is “an integral part of the project to advance the project aims”.

In this video testimonial, Jane Freeman at Leeds General Infirmary explains how her Whitley A95 Workstation improves the working methods in her Clostridium difficile research. Jane reports that she and her team are able to use the workstation for “several hours at a time in relative comfort” and that the workstation is able to house all the technical equipment her team requires. This allows “the whole experiment to be performed in optimum conditions without introducing air at all”. Jane explains that “reliability, versatility and space are the significant benefits of the workstations in our work on Clostridium difficile“.

The Institute of Cancer Research in London is one of the world’s most influential research institutes, with an outstanding record of achievement dating back more than 100 years. At the Institute, George Poulogiannis uses a combination of Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation (with Seahorse XF Analyzer) and Whitley H35 Hypoxystation in his research into breast cancer. Hypoxia is a key factor in the “Hallmarks of Cancer” and this team are studying the role of hypoxia in cell invasion and metastasis, oncogene-induced senescence and resistance to current treatment options. The i2 and H35 replicate a physiologically relevant atmosphere for these studies, enabling consistent and reliable results. This combination of Workstations is also used by Dr Ayse Latif, who is researching gynaecological cancers at The University of Manchester.

Don Whitley Scientific would like to take this opportunity to thank all customers who have provided testimonials. If you would be interested in supplying a testimonial, please contact Alex_Rhodes@dwscientific.co.uk.

Take a look at our other testimonials

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See the WASPLab at ECCMID 2017 in Vienna

WASPLab to be shown at the forthcoming 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

Held in Vienna, this event brings together the world’s leading experts to discuss the latest developments in infectious diseases, infection control and clinical microbiology. The scientific programme features talks from key figures in antibiotic susceptibility testing, infection control and antimicrobial resistance.

Representatives from Don Whitley Scientific will be present on the Copan stand at this event to help promote WASPLab. WASPLab is the sophisticated barcode driven microbiology specimen processor and work-up system, moving samples from front end processing to full specimen management, automated incubation and digital microbiology.  With its modular design and small footprint, WASPLab can be customised to the unique needs of the lab.  The robotic plate management system, smart incubators and state-of-the-art image acquisition technology are changing the way labs work and opening the door for groundbreaking digital microbiology.

Don Whitley Scientific is one of the primary distributors of the WASPLab in the UK. We have installed a WASPLab at Leeds General Infirmary and will soon be installing a second system at Manchester Royal Infirmary. We invite you to come along and meet representatives from Don Whitley Scientific on Copan’s stand at this international event.

 

WASPLab

WASPLab

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Hypoxia and the Hallmarks of Cancer

Therapeutic Targeting of Hypoxia and HIFs in Cancer. Dr Burga Kalz Fuller from US distributor HypOxygen has summarised this study that outlines the Hallmarks of Cancer.

“Tumour hypoxia and HIFs affect most of the cancer hallmarks… and contribute to chemo- and radiotherapy resistance.” In their review from 2016, Wigerup, Pahlman and Bexell of Lund University in Sweden discuss how hypoxia inducible factors HIFs regulate the hypoxic microenvironment in cancer, and the therapeutic strategies that are being developed to improve patients’ prognosis. Dr. Sven Pahlman’s lab has been using the H35 Hypoxystation for more than 5 years, to research SCLC and neuroblastoma, and their data is contributing to the understanding of the role of oxygen levels in the progression of cancer.

Hypoxia and HIF-1α and 2α expression in cancer usually signify a worse prognosis, but most hypoxia-induced transcriptional, translational, and epigenetic changes are cell-type specific. Many effects engendered by hypoxia are mediated directly or indirectly via HIF pathways, and most are causative of the iconic “Hallmarks of Cancer” that Hanahan and Weinberg introduced in 2000 and expanded in 2011. Hypoxia induces increased autophagy, apoptosis, and aberrant cell proliferation; neoangiogenesis mediated by VEGF and PDGF-β; proliferation of cancer stem cells; metabolic reprogramming to satisfy energy and synthetic requirements in proliferating cells; modulation of inflammation and immune responses; genomic instability through increased mutagenesis and diminished DNA repair; and metastasis as hypoxia induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and degradation of the extracellular matrix. Assaying the relationship between hypoxia and the Hallmarks of Cancer benefits significantly from the physiological atmosphere mimicked in the Hypoxystation, a closed-culture hypoxia workstation controlling gasses, temperature and humidity.


Visit Don Whitley Scientific and HypOxygen at

Keystone Adaptations to Hypoxia and Tumour Metabolism

Location: Whistler, BC  Date: 5th – 9th March

Sven Pahlman


In their review, Wigerup and Pahlman describe the role tumour hypoxia plays for cancer therapy and treatment resistance, as oxygen levels, production of reactive oxygen species ROS, and HIF activity are intertwined actors in the cancer battle. Any and all effects of hypoxia are cell-type specific; however, numerous studies indicate that HIF’s mediate chemoresistance, suggesting that HIF-1 and 2 inhibitors can effectively support cancer therapy. The authors state that “since hypoxia is a hallmark of solid tumours and mediates aggressive, metastatic, and resistant disease, it is arguably one of the most attractive therapeutic targets in cancer.” Strategies selectively targeting hypoxia for cancer therapy include hypoxia-activated prodrugs; inhibitors of HIF mRNA and protein expression; and inhibitors of downstream HIF signalling pathways such as VEGF. Effective drug research relies on authentic replication of the hypoxic environment for cell culture: the Hypoxystation used in the Pahlman lab is able to accommodate long-term assays with sterile steam humidification and HEPA clean air. The Hypoxystation concept “Choose your Atmosphere – Define your Environment” is the best way to ensure cell culture reflects physiology in cancer research and therapy.

Hypoxia is at the heart of the Hallmarks of Cancer, and results such as these from the Pahlman lab make the cancer research community hopeful that “HIF inhibition is likely to be a powerful therapeutic approach” to eradicate cancer.

Hallmarks of Cancer

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MEDLAB 2017

Export representatives from Don Whitley Scientific have been at MEDLAB 2017, an international conference in Dubai that is one of the biggest exhibitions for the Middle East healthcare industry. Formerly the event was a joint venture with Arab Health, but MEDLAB is now its own independent event. Don Whitley Scientific had exhibition stand at the event which displayed a Whitley A35 Anaerobic Workstation and the Whitley Jar Gassing System.

MEDLAB houses 700 exhibitors from 38 countries, giving delegates access to cutting edge products and services from all continents. As well as this huge exhibition, the event also features an extensive lecture programme including topics such as Haematology, Clinical Microbiology and Immunology. The event was held at the Dubai International Convention and Exhibition Centre. As well as offering delegates access to new and developing products from a diverse range of companies, the event was also an opportunity for those wanting to make business connections and expand their distributor network.

 

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Joe and Alun at the Don Whitley Scientific exhibition stand

Visitors to the Don Whitley Scientific got up close with two key DWS products. Firstly, the Whitley Jar Gassing System in which users can create perfect conditions for growing anaerobes in jars in just 2 minutes, a popular product which has been manufactured and sold by Don Whitley Scientific for decades. The Whitley A35 Anaerobic Workstation shares a similar concept to the WJGS in creating a reliable, anaerobic environment. The A35 provides the ability to manipulate samples in a sustainable environment where parameters can be altered to create the required conditions, unique features such as the Instant Access Porthole system make working in the chamber simple and straight forward.

MEDLAB is always a popular event and one that Don Whitley Scientific’s export team ensure to attend every year to promote the best Anaerobic Workstations on the market.

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Don Whitley Visits The Francis Crick Institute

Dr Don Whitley, chairman and founder of DWS, recently visited The Francis Crick Institute in London to see the recently installed Whitley H45 Hypoxystation at the site. 

The Crick has moved into a brand new state-of-the-art building in the centre of London. Situated next to Kings Cross and St Pancras stations, The Crick brings together 1500 scientists and staff working collaboratively in the biggest biomedical research facility under one roof in Europe. The work at The Crick covers many disciplines and applications in biomedical research, all with the aim of improving understanding of human health and disease.

 

Don Whitley established Don Whitley Scientific in 1976 and today Don Whitley Scientific Limited is a leading international supplier of innovative equipment and services to the microbiology and tissue culture industries. Recently DWS installed a H45 Hypoxystation into the institute, and Don Whitley went to visit the new customer with a member of the sales team.

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Don Whitley (far right) with one of the groups that will be using the Whitley H45 Hypoxystation

The Whitley H45 Hypoxystation has sufficient space to accommodate a variety of equipment whilst still providing generous working and incubation areas. Whitley Hypoxystations can be equipped with a range of unique options and features, including CO2 monitoring and automatic dehumidification fitted as standard, features that will make working with the H45 easy and efficient for the team at The Crick.

With his name featured on products in hundreds of clinical and research laboratories worldwide, it can be said that the staff at The Crick were excited to meet Don Whitley himself. The excitement was shared by Don, who enjoyed looking around one of the most exciting centres for biomedical research in the UK and taking a few pictures along the way.

 

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Don takes a photo looking out over the atrium of The Francis Crick Institute

 

Dr John Heap, Imperial College London

Realising the potential for synthetic biology

At Don Whitley Scientific we love to hear about the different applications and scientific disciplines in which our workstations are used. We recently came across a video of a presentation at the World Economic Forum in 2015. The clip is entitled: “Hacking exotic organisms and putting them to work“. Dr John Heap, who is an academic scientist and research group leader at Imperial College London, talks about harnessing diverse organisms including anaerobic bacteria, and realising the potential of synthetic biology for a variety of applications.

You will also see a very quick shot of Dr Heap using his Whitley Workstation!

For more information about Dr Heap and his work, here’s a link to the Heap Lab website.

 

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Paper Highlights How Cells Respond to Stress Conditions

Dr Burga Kalz Fuller, Product Manager at HypOxygen (Don Whitley Scientific’s Hypoxystation provider in the USA/Canada) summarises a study entitled “Adaptation to Stressors by Systemic Protein Amyloidogenesis”. The paper, by Whitley Hypoxystation users Tim Audas and Stephen Lee, details how certain cells activate a process of systemic amyloidogenesis, which allows them to survive during difficult conditions.

Cells facing environmental threats have developed numerous coping mechanisms, and Hypoxystation users Tim Audas and Stephen Lee have uncovered a fascinating new cellular strategy to remain viable under stress and restore homeostasis when the crisis ends. In their recent paper “Adaptation to Stressors by Systemic Protein Amyloidogenesis“, they describe a physiological process of amyloidogenesis which cells activate under stress conditions, such as hypoxia and acidosis, to remove copious amounts of heterogeneous proteins from circulation, enabling cells to survive in a dormant state. This discovery expands our current view of amyloids as a rare and pathological phenomenon associated with neuropathies such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, and exposes a novel post-translational, regulatory form of protein organization.

Using a combination of Congo red staining, proteinase K digestion, and OC antibody detection on cells exposed to a variety of stimuli in the Hypoxystation, Audas et al. were able to identify nuclear foci consisting of immobilized, insoluble protein in a crossed β-sheet conformation which they named A-Bodies. In amyloidogenic proteins such as VHL and RNF8, an ACM (amyloid-converting motif) containing arginine and histidine was identified as essential for capture specifically in the A-bodies; a similar motif was also identified in the pathological β-amyloid associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Upon environmental insult, the ACM interacts with ribosomal intergenic spacer RNA (rIGSRNA) to concentrate the proteins and trigger their polymerization in the A-bodies allowing the cells to enter a dormant state.

Audas et al. exerted this type of severe stress on the cells through incubation at pH 6.0 and 1% oxygen in the H35 Hypoxystation by Don Whitley Scientific. The Hypoxystation’s closed workstation format and rigorous control of oxygen, CO2, temperature and humidity facilitate accurate regulation of cell culture conditions as the in vivo situation of adverse environmental stimuli is simulated. Upon reversion to standard growth conditions (21% oxygen and pH 7.4), the A-bodies dissipated within 4 hours and protein was refolded into the native conformation. The hypoxic and acidotic conditions simulated in the Hypoxystation are also characteristic of the tumor microenvironment, where mouse xenograft assays identified the same process of rIGSRNA-mediated A-body formation causing cancer cell dormancy.

Read more on this paper by HypOxygen

Read the full paper here